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What I'd like my program to do is something along these lines:

for (int i = 0; i < btns.Length; i++)
{
    //Flash red
    btns[i].BackColor = Color.Red;
    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(500);
    //Change to green
    btns[i].BackColor = Color.Green;
}

Where btns is a collection of buttons that change colour.

But when my code executes, it sleeps for 2.5 seconds (because of the 5 buttons) and then they all change colour to green at once, without flashing red. My guess is that this is because it takes longer to finish changing the colour than it does to reach the Sleep function, which pulls everything to a halt.

I've tried using timers, which had their own problems. For this, I'd rather just change > wait > change. Is there a way I can accomplish that?

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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

My guess is that this is because it takes longer to finish changing the colour than it does to reach the Sleep function, which pulls everything to a halt.

No, the problem is that the thread which is responsible for doing the actual drawing is the one which you've put to sleep. Blocking the UI thread is never a good idea.

I've tried using timers, which had their own problems.

Nevertheless, they're quite possibly the simplest approach before C# 5. Basically you want to change the colour, then let the UI thread get on with whatever it wants to, then change the colour again half a second later, etc. A timer will let you do that.

Using C# 5 does make it easier though. You could write an async method like this:

public async Task FlashButtons()
{
    foreach (Button button in buttons) // No need for a for loop here
    {
        button.BackColor = Color.Red;
        await Task.Delay(500);
        button.BackColor = Color.Green;
    }
}

Using await in conjunction Task.Delay "pauses" your async method, but without actually blocking the UI thread. I don't have time to give details of how async/await works right now, but there are plenty of resources online, such as this MSDN page.

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