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I've declared the following struct:

struct StartPositions
{
    public Vector2 pacman;
    public Vector2[] ghosts;

    // Constructor accepts a Vector2, and an array of Vector2's.
    public StartPositions(Vector2 pacmanPosIn, Vector2[] ghostsPosIn)
    {
        pacman = pacmanPosIn;
        for(int a=0;a<ghostsPosIn.Length;a++)
        {
            ghosts[a] = ghostsPosIn[a];
        }
    }
}

However I get a compiler error saying the ghosts field must be fully assigned. What I want to do is pass in a Vector2, and a Vector2 array when I create a StartPositions object - making a copy of that array.

How can I do this correctly?

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4  
You forgot to allocate the array for ghosts. –  Eric Lippert Apr 14 '13 at 15:43
    
Oh crikey tell me that's not true –  CdrTomalak Apr 14 '13 at 15:46
1  
You know that compiler error you got that said that ghosts was never assigned to? It was correct. –  Eric Lippert Apr 14 '13 at 15:52

4 Answers 4

You did not initialize the ghosts array. You need to add a call to new.

public StartPositions(Vector2 pacmanPosIn, Vector2[] ghostsPosIn)
{
    pacman = pacmanPosIn;
    ghosts = new Vector2[ghostsPosIn.Length];
    ....
}

And you can simplify the code by replacing the for loop with a call to Array.Copy().

Array.Copy(ghostsPosIn, ghosts, ghosts.Length);
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Thanks - stupid mistake –  CdrTomalak Apr 14 '13 at 15:47

You have to initialize your ghosts array first:

struct StartPositions
{
    public Vector2 pacman;
    public Vector2[] ghosts;

    // Constructor accepts a Vector2, and an array of Vector2's.
    public StartPositions(Vector2 pacmanPosIn, Vector2[] ghostsPosIn)
    {
        pacman = pacmanPosIn;
        ghosts = new Vector2[ghostsPosIn.Length];
        for(int a=0;a<ghostsPosIn.Length;a++)
        {
            ghosts[a] = ghostsPosIn[a];
        }
    }
}
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You didn't initialize ghosts array.

public StartPositions(Vector2 pacmanPosIn, Vector2[] ghostsPosIn)
{
    ...
    ghosts = new Vector2[ghostsPosIn.Length];
    ...
}

From C# Language Specification;

Actual array instances are created dynamically at run-time using the new operator. The new operation specifies the length of the new array instance, which is then fixed for the lifetime of the instance.

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One annoying quirk in .net is that unless one is using "unsafe" code the concept of a value-type array does not exist. The struct as shown contains a position for the "pacman" and a reference to a mutable array that holds the positions of the ghosts. This is an evil combination, since the struct may appear to encapsulate the positions of the ghosts, but it does not. Thus, if one were to say:

StartPositions p1 = whatever();
... do some stuff
StartPositions p2 = p1;
p2.pacman.X += 3;
p2.ghosts[0].X += 3;

the code would add three to p2.pacman and p2.ghosts[0]; it would not affect p1.pacman.X but would add three to p1.ghosts[0]. Such behavior would likely cause confusion.

If your intention is that StartPositions will be read-only, it should probably never expose the ghosts array directly; instead, ghosts should be a property of type IList<Vector2>, and your constructor should set it to something like a new ReadOnlyList<Vector2> initialized with a copy of the passed-in positions. If it does that, then ghosts can simply be a read-only property that returns such positions.

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