Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This code is used to evaluate the information given by a timer. I want it to activate when the timing is valid and I want the timer to reset when certain criteria occurs. And I want the code to continually check these parameters. x, a, and b continually change.

Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch(); //sets sw as the stopwatch variable
sw.Start(); //starts stopwatch
for (int i = 0; ; i++) //counter
{
     if (i % 1000000 == 0) //sets counter limit
     {
          sw.Stop();  //stops stopwatch
          if (sw.ElapsedMilliseconds >= 3000)  //when the elapsed time is > 3 secs
          {
              comPort.WriteLine("1"); //sends a 1 to an arduino 
              break; //breaks for loop
          }
          else if (sw.ElapsedMilliseconds < 3000) //when the elapsed time is < 3 secs
          {
              if ((Math.Abs(x-a) < 150) && (Math.Abs(x-b) < 150)) //criteria to start
              {
                  sw.Start(); //continues stopwatch
              }
              else if ((Math.Abs(x-a) > 150) && (Math.Abs(x-b) > 150)) //criteria reset
              {
                  sw.Reset(); //resets stopwatch
                  break; //breaks for loop
              }
          }
     }
}
share|improve this question
1  
Do you think StackOverFlow Q&A exchange site is a homework helper site ? –  Davut Gürbüz Apr 14 '13 at 16:07
    
@DavutGürbüz No, but its for help with programming in general. A good explanation by a peer as to what is wrong with the code can be much more helpful than an explanation by a professor. –  Pete Garafano Apr 14 '13 at 16:32
    
@TheGreatCO You can be sure I didn't give to jeff a -1. But any SO user doesn't welcome with these things; Please help! It is urgent ! As soon as possible ! especially homework. You do not need these expressions. Just take effort & research and ask what you can't find out. –  Davut Gürbüz Apr 14 '13 at 16:46
add comment

2 Answers

One obvious problem that I see--the stopwatch is stopped for basically the whole loop. It's not going to do anything resembling keeping proper time.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm confused on why you say that. It should restart each time x-a and x-b are greater than 150. From testing, the code sends the "1" to the arduino when x-a and x-b are less than 150 for 3 secs, but the restarting doesn't occur for the other condition. If proper timing doesn't occur, then can you help to explain why the "1" is being sent to the arduino to activate our system? Thanks –  jeffrey twum Apr 14 '13 at 17:31
add comment

A big flag I see here is that you're polling the stopwatch by iterating a for loop. This uses unnecessary CPU resources. It'd be better to switch to an event driven system, using System.Timers.Timer objects, and enabling them as logic dictates. Below is an implementation of your logic in the example above using Timers instead. One timer is set to check the value of x every 500 milliseconds, and turns on the 3 second timer accordingly.

using System;
using System.Timers;

public class HelloWorld
{
    static int a = 0, x = 0, b = 100;
    static Timer timerOut, timerCheck;

    static public void Main()
    {
        timerOut = new Timer(3000);
        timerOut.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(OnOutElapsed);
        timerCheck = new Timer(500); 
        timerCheck.Elapsed += new ElapsedEventHandler(OnCheckElapsed);
        timerCheck.Start();

        for(;;) {
            Console.WriteLine("Input x or (Q)uit");
            string s = Console.ReadLine();
            if(s.ToLower() == "q") break;
            x = Convert.ToInt32(s);
        }
    }

    private static void OnCheckElapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        if((Math.Abs(x-a) < 150) && (Math.Abs(x-b) < 150)) {
            if(!timerOut.Enabled) {
                Console.WriteLine("starting timer (x={0})",x);
                timerOut.Start(); 
            }
        }
        else if((Math.Abs(x-a) > 150) && (Math.Abs(x-b) > 150)) {
            if(timerOut.Enabled) {
                Console.WriteLine("stopping timer (x={0})",x);
                timerOut.Stop();
            }
        }
    }

    private static void OnOutElapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e) 
    {
        Console.WriteLine("write to com port");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I'm pretty new to c# coding. I'm a little confused about what the for loop is doing under the Main() method, as well as, what the purpose of the Console.WriteLine is? –  jeffrey twum Apr 14 '13 at 18:09
    
The above example is meant to be run as a console application. The loop is just so you can change the value of x when running the example above from a console window. Console.WriteLine writes a string to the console to be displayed to the user. You can think of that for-loop as the rest of your application changing the values of x, a, and b. –  mtadd Apr 14 '13 at 18:15
    
This code doesn't seem to be resetting the timer once it has been enabled. I'm using the Microsoft Kinect data, and in my code, x is the shoulderCenter depth, a is the Handleft depth, and b is the Handright depth. Those positions are constantly updating; however, once the OnOutElapsed function is run, it doesn't seem to ever turn off. –  jeffrey twum Apr 17 '13 at 15:08
    
after initializing timerOut, add the line timerOut.AutoReset = False; to make the Timer only fire once. –  mtadd Apr 17 '13 at 19:52
    
do you think if i have the xbox kinect facing the ground instead of sitting on a table, that it will mess up the ability for it to track a user? –  jeffrey twum Apr 19 '13 at 20:50
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.