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I was wondering if the following migration is possible with Django south and still retain data.

Before:

I currently have two apps, one called tv, one called movies, each with a VideoFile model (simplified here):

tv/models.py:

class VideoFile(models.Model):
    show = models.ForeignKey(Show, blank=True, null=True)
    name = models.CharField(max_length=1024, blank=True)
    size = models.IntegerField(blank=True, null=True)
    ctime = models.DateTimeField(blank=True, null=True)

movies/models.py:

class VideoFile(models.Model):
    movie = models.ForeignKey(Movie, blank=True, null=True)
    name = models.CharField(max_length=1024, blank=True)
    size = models.IntegerField(blank=True, null=True)
    ctime = models.DateTimeField(blank=True, null=True)

After:

Because the two videofile objects are so similar I want to get rid of duplication and create a new model in a separate app called media that contains a generic VideoFile class and use inheritance to extend it:

media/models.py:

class VideoFile(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=1024, blank=True)
    size = models.IntegerField(blank=True, null=True)
    ctime = models.DateTimeField(blank=True, null=True)

tv/models.py:

class VideoFile(media.models.VideoFile):
    show = models.ForeignKey(Show, blank=True, null=True)

movies/models.py:

class VideoFile(media.models.VideoFile):
    movie = models.ForeignKey(Movie, blank=True, null=True)

So my question is, how can I accomplish this with django-south and still maintain existing data?

All three these apps are already managed by south migrations and according to the south documentation it is bad practice to combine a schema and data migration and they recommend it should be done in a few steps.

I think it could be done using separate migrations like this (assuming media.VideoFile is already created)

  1. Schema migration to rename all fields in tv.VideoFile and movies.VideoFile that will move to the new media.VideoFile model, maybe to something like old_name, old_size, etc
  2. Schema migration to tv.VideoFile and movies.VideoFile to inherit from media.VideoFile
  3. Data migration to copy old_name to name, old_size to size, etc
  4. Scheme migration to remove old_ fields

Before I go through all that work, do you think that will work? Is there a better way?

If you're interested, the project is hosted here: http://code.google.com/p/medianav/

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4 Answers

up vote 44 down vote accepted
+50

Check out response below by Paul for some notes on compatibility with newer versions of Django/South.


This seemed like an interesting problem, and I'm becoming a big fan of South, so I decided to look into this a bit. I built a test project on the abstract of what you've described above, and have successfully used South to perform the migration you are asking about. Here's a couple of notes before we get to the code:

  • The South documentation recommends doing schema migrations and data migrations separate. I've followed suit in this.

  • On the backend, Django represents an inherited table by automatically creating a OneToOne field on the inheriting model

  • Understanding this, our South migration needs to properly handle the OneToOne field manually, however, in experimenting with this it seems that South (or perhaps Django itself) cannot create a OneToOne filed on multiple inherited tables with the same name. Because of this, I renamed each child-table in the movies/tv app to be respective to it's own app (ie. MovieVideoFile/ShowVideoFile).

  • In playing with the actual data migration code, it seems South prefers to create the OneToOne field first, and then assign data to it. Assigning data to the OneToOne field during creation cause South to choke. (A fair compromise for all the coolness that is South).

So having said all that, I tried to keep a log of the console commands being issued. I'll interject commentary where necessary. The final code is at the bottom.

Command History

django-admin.py startproject southtest
manage.py startapp movies
manage.py startapp tv
manage.py syncdb
manage.py startmigration movies --initial
manage.py startmigration tv --initial
manage.py migrate
manage.py shell          # added some fake data...
manage.py startapp media
manage.py startmigration media --initial
manage.py migrate
# edited code, wrote new models, but left old ones intact
manage.py startmigration movies unified-videofile --auto
# create a new (blank) migration to hand-write data migration
manage.py startmigration movies videofile-to-movievideofile-data 
manage.py migrate
# edited code, wrote new models, but left old ones intact
manage.py startmigration tv unified-videofile --auto
# create a new (blank) migration to hand-write data migration
manage.py startmigration tv videofile-to-movievideofile-data
manage.py migrate
# removed old VideoFile model from apps
manage.py startmigration movies removed-videofile --auto
manage.py startmigration tv removed-videofile --auto
manage.py migrate

For space sake, and since the models invariably look the same in the end, I'm only going to demonstrate with 'movies' app.

movies/models.py

from django.db import models
from media.models import VideoFile as BaseVideoFile

# This model remains until the last migration, which deletes 
# it from the schema.  Note the name conflict with media.models
class VideoFile(models.Model):
    movie = models.ForeignKey(Movie, blank=True, null=True)
    name = models.CharField(max_length=1024, blank=True)
    size = models.IntegerField(blank=True, null=True)
    ctime = models.DateTimeField(blank=True, null=True)

class MovieVideoFile(BaseVideoFile):
    movie = models.ForeignKey(Movie, blank=True, null=True, related_name='shows')

movies/migrations/0002_unified-videofile.py (schema migration)

from south.db import db
from django.db import models
from movies.models import *

class Migration:

    def forwards(self, orm):

        # Adding model 'MovieVideoFile'
        db.create_table('movies_movievideofile', (
            ('videofile_ptr', orm['movies.movievideofile:videofile_ptr']),
            ('movie', orm['movies.movievideofile:movie']),
        ))
        db.send_create_signal('movies', ['MovieVideoFile'])

    def backwards(self, orm):

        # Deleting model 'MovieVideoFile'
        db.delete_table('movies_movievideofile')

movies/migration/0003_videofile-to-movievideofile-data.py (data migration)

from south.db import db
from django.db import models
from movies.models import *

class Migration:

    def forwards(self, orm):
        for movie in orm['movies.videofile'].objects.all():
            new_movie = orm.MovieVideoFile.objects.create(movie = movie.movie,)
            new_movie.videofile_ptr = orm['media.VideoFile'].objects.create()

            # videofile_ptr must be created first before values can be assigned
            new_movie.videofile_ptr.name = movie.name
            new_movie.videofile_ptr.size = movie.size
            new_movie.videofile_ptr.ctime = movie.ctime
            new_movie.videofile_ptr.save()

    def backwards(self, orm):
        print 'No Backwards'

South is awesome!

Ok standard disclaimer: You're dealing with live data. I've given you working code here, but please use the --db-dry-run to test your schema. Always make a backup before trying anything, and generally be careful.

COMPATIBILITY NOTICE

I'm going to keep my original message intact, but South has since changed the command manage.py startmigration into manage.py schemamigration.

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Thank you very much for all the work you've put into this. If I could vote more than once I would! I think I'll take your advice and name the models different to avoid name clashes in the future too. This is fantastic. –  Andre Miller Oct 22 '09 at 7:22
4  
A couple things: 1) startmigration was actually split into schemamigration and datamigration. The latter doesn't take the --auto or --initial flags, just the app name and the migration name, and gives you a migration file with empty forwards and backwards methods. 2) Instead of print 'No Backwards', you should use raise RuntimeError("Cannot reverse this migration.") per the South docs. –  Mike DeSimone May 6 '10 at 18:49
2  
Why didn't you use class Meta: abstract = True ? –  muudscope May 24 '10 at 17:31
1  
@TStone, thanks a lot for putting so much work in this, it really helped me understand how to do this with south. –  Paul Dec 24 '10 at 23:12
1  
I did have a few problems with this solution, I think it is mostly due to changes in django 1.2 and south 0.7, see the solution that finally worked for me below. –  Paul Jan 26 '11 at 14:44
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I did try to walk through the solution outlined by T Stone and while I think it's a superb starter and explains how things should be done I ran into a few problems.

I think mostly you don't need to create the table entry for the parent class anymore, i.e. you don't need

new_movie.videofile_ptr = orm['media.VideoFile'].objects.create()

anymore. Django will now do this automatically for you (if you have non-null fields then the above did not work for me and gave me a database error).

I think it is probably due to changes in django and south, here is a version that worked for me on ubuntu 10.10 with django 1.2.3 and south 0.7.1. The models are a little different, but you will get the gist:

Initial setup

post1/models.py:

class Author(models.Model):
    first = models.CharField(max_length=30)
    last = models.CharField(max_length=30)

class Tag(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=30, primary_key=True)

class Post(models.Model):
    created_on = models.DateTimeField()
    author = models.ForeignKey(Author)
    tags = models.ManyToManyField(Tag)
    title = models.CharField(max_length=128, blank=True)
    content = models.TextField(blank=True)

post2/models.py:

class Author(models.Model):
    first = models.CharField(max_length=30)
    middle = models.CharField(max_length=30)
    last = models.CharField(max_length=30)

class Tag(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=30)

class Category(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=30)

class Post(models.Model):
    created_on = models.DateTimeField()
    author = models.ForeignKey(Author)
    tags = models.ManyToManyField(Tag)
    title = models.CharField(max_length=128, blank=True)
    content = models.TextField(blank=True)
    extra_content = models.TextField(blank=True)
    category = models.ForeignKey(Category)

There is obviously a lot of overlap, so I wanted to factor the commonalities out into a general post model and only keep the differences in the other model classes.

new setup:

genpost/models.py:

class Author(models.Model):
    first = models.CharField(max_length=30)
    middle = models.CharField(max_length=30, blank=True)
    last = models.CharField(max_length=30)

class Tag(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=30, primary_key=True)

class Post(models.Model):
    created_on = models.DateTimeField()
    author = models.ForeignKey(Author)
    tags = models.ManyToManyField(Tag)
    title = models.CharField(max_length=128, blank=True)
    content = models.TextField(blank=True)

post1/models.py:

import genpost.models as gp

class SimplePost(gp.Post):
    class Meta:
        proxy = True

post2/models.py:

import genpost.models as gp

class Category(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=30)

class ExtPost(gp.Post):
    extra_content = models.TextField(blank=True)
    category = models.ForeignKey(Category)

If you want to follow along you will first need to get these models into south:

$./manage.py schemamigration post1 --initial
$./manage.py schemamigration post2 --initial
$./manage.py migrate

Migrating the data

How to go about it? First write the new app genpost and do the initial migrations with south:

$./manage.py schemamigration genpost --initial

(I am using $ to represent the shells prompt, so don't type that.)

Next create the new classes SimplePost and ExtPost in post1/models.py and post2/models.py respectively (don't delete the rest of the classes yet). Then create schemamigrations for these two as well:

$./manage.py schemamigration post1 --auto
$./manage.py schemamigration post2 --auto

Now we can apply all these migrations:

$./manage.py migrate

Let's get to the heart of the matter, migrating the data from post1 and post2 to genpost:

$./manage.py datamigration genpost post1_and_post2_to_genpost --freeze post1 --freeze post2

Then edit genpost/migrations/0002_post1_and_post2_to_genpost.py:

class Migration(DataMigration):

    def forwards(self, orm):

        # 
        # Migrate common data into the new genpost models
        #
        for auth1 in orm['post1.author'].objects.all():
            new_auth = orm.Author()
            new_auth.first = auth1.first
            new_auth.last = auth1.last
            new_auth.save()

        for auth2 in orm['post2.author'].objects.all():
            new_auth = orm.Author()
            new_auth.first = auth2.first
            new_auth.middle = auth2.middle
            new_auth.last = auth2.last
            new_auth.save()

        for tag in orm['post1.tag'].objects.all():
            new_tag = orm.Tag()
            new_tag.name = tag.name
            new_tag.save()

        for tag in orm['post2.tag'].objects.all():
            new_tag = orm.Tag()
            new_tag.name = tag.name
            new_tag.save()

        for post1 in orm['post1.post'].objects.all():
            new_genpost = orm.Post()

            # Content
            new_genpost.created_on = post1.created_on
            new_genpost.title = post1.title
            new_genpost.content = post1.content

            # Foreign keys
            new_genpost.author = orm['genpost.author'].objects.filter(\
                    first=post1.author.first,last=post1.author.last)[0]

            new_genpost.save() # Needed for M2M updates
            for tag in post1.tags.all():
                new_genpost.tags.add(\
                        orm['genpost.tag'].objects.get(name=tag.name))

            new_genpost.save()
            post1.delete()

        for post2 in orm['post2.post'].objects.all():
            new_extpost = p2.ExtPost() 
            new_extpost.created_on = post2.created_on
            new_extpost.title = post2.title
            new_extpost.content = post2.content

            # Foreign keys
            new_extpost.author_id = orm['genpost.author'].objects.filter(\
                    first=post2.author.first,\
                    middle=post2.author.middle,\
                    last=post2.author.last)[0].id

            new_extpost.extra_content = post2.extra_content
            new_extpost.category_id = post2.category_id

            # M2M fields
            new_extpost.save()
            for tag in post2.tags.all():
                new_extpost.tags.add(tag.name) # name is primary key

            new_extpost.save()
            post2.delete()

        # Get rid of author and tags in post1 and post2
        orm['post1.author'].objects.all().delete()
        orm['post1.tag'].objects.all().delete()
        orm['post2.author'].objects.all().delete()
        orm['post2.tag'].objects.all().delete()


    def backwards(self, orm):
        raise RuntimeError("No backwards.")

Now apply these migrations:

$./manage.py migrate

Next you can delete the now redundant parts from post1/models.py and post2/models.py and then create schemamigrations to update the tables to the new state:

$./manage.py schemamigration post1 --auto
$./manage.py schemamigration post2 --auto
$./manage.py migrate

And that should be it! Hopefully it all works and you have refactored your models.

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I would suggest to add depends_on for post1 and post2 over datamigration of genpost to prevent any execution order accident. So, others can just type ./manage.py migrate (south.readthedocs.org/en/latest/dependencies.html) –  zatta May 18 '13 at 0:32
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Abstract Model

class VideoFile(models.Model):
    name = models.CharField(max_length=1024, blank=True)
    size = models.IntegerField(blank=True, null=True)
    ctime = models.DateTimeField(blank=True, null=True)
    class Meta:
        abstract = True

May be generic relation will be useful for you too.

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If I define the parent class as an abstract model, can I then skip the whole migration process? Will south still be in sync? –  Andre Miller Oct 21 '09 at 11:25
    
Abstract Model doesn't sync. Only it's "children". –  Oduvan Oct 21 '09 at 12:10
    
O.. sorry, I doesn't use south before. –  Oduvan Oct 21 '09 at 12:12
    
I can see how I can do it manually, but I already have an existing user base and would like to use south to automate the migration and not have them lose any data. –  Andre Miller Oct 21 '09 at 12:15
    
If you use abstract inheritance like this, I don't think you need any migration at all. So that's a plus. The negative side is that you still have duplication at the database level, and you can't query all VideoFiles at once. –  Carl Meyer Oct 21 '09 at 16:19
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I did a similar migration and I chose to do it in multiple steps. In addition to creating the multiple migrations, I also created the backward migration to provide a fallback if things went wrong. Then, I grabbed some test data and migrated it forward and backwards until I was sure it was coming out correctly when I migrated forwards. Finally, I migrated the production site.

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Do you have an example of what your migrations looked like? How did you copy the data from the old to the new schema? –  Andre Miller Oct 21 '09 at 14:25
    
@Andre have you looked at the South docs for data migrations? It's pretty much just like using the ORM normally, except you do it through the "orm" parameter passed to your backwards/forwards method (so you'll always have the right version of your models for running that migration, no matter the current state of your models). –  Carl Meyer Oct 21 '09 at 16:20
    
I did see it and have played with it. I was just wondering if the steps I mentioned above, renaming the fields first so there isn't a clash is the simplest way of doing it. –  Andre Miller Oct 21 '09 at 19:00
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