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I am going through a book to learn C++ and copied this straight from it;

#include <iostream>
#include <Windows.h>

using namespace std;

int main()
{
    cout << "Enter true (1) or false (0) for two operands:" << endl;
    bool Op1 = false, Op2 = false;
    cin >> Op1;
    cin >> Op2;

    cout << Op1 << " AND " << Op2 << " = " << (Op1 && Op2) << endl;
    cout << Op1 << " OR " << Op2 << " = " << (Op1 ¦¦ Op2) << endl;


    Sleep(60000);

    return 0;
}

I added the windows.h and sleep function, but apart from that it's identical. It keeps saying - lesson5.cpp(14): error C2146: syntax error : missing ')' before identifier '¦¦'

I've been trying to fix it for about half an hour now but can't find any solutions on the internet. Anyone please help me? It seems very strange and I hope it's something glaringly obvious that I'm just missing.

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Watch out copying code from this book. It was typeset with non-standard ASCII characters. –  Hans Passant Apr 14 '13 at 16:36
    
On a completely unrelated note, that windows.h include is just atrocious. –  Daniel Kamil Kozar Apr 14 '13 at 16:36
1  
@DanielKamilKozar: Why? It's the documented way to get the declaration of Sleep. (Of course, the use of Sleep does seem rather unnecessary.) –  Charles Bailey Apr 14 '13 at 16:38
    
Sure, I meant that using Sleep here is not needed. :P –  Daniel Kamil Kozar Apr 14 '13 at 16:39
    
Calling system("pause") so you can see the console window output doesn't win prizes either. –  Hans Passant Apr 14 '13 at 16:40

2 Answers 2

There seens to be wrong chars here: (Op1 ¦¦ Op2). It should be: (Op1 || Op2)

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Ah great, thank you, it is literally written ¦¦ in the book. Sorry for the rookie question. –  Jonathan Cain Apr 14 '13 at 16:33

You shouldn't copy and paste code from documents/PDF as they may contain characters which are not valid C++.

So just type this part (Op1 ¦¦ Op2) yourself as (Op1 || Op2).

share|improve this answer
    
I did actually write it out, its from a physical book, I just would not have known the symbol was incorrect as it isn't suggested at all in the book. Thanks for the pointer though. –  Jonathan Cain Apr 14 '13 at 19:12

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