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class Base
{
    public :
        void func()
        {
            cout << "Base func()" << endl;
        }
};

class DerivedA : public Base
{
    public :
        void func()
        {
            cout << "Derived A func()" << endl;
        }
};

class DerivedB : public Base
{
    public :
        void func()
        {
            cout << "Derived B func()" << endl;
        }
};

void main()
{
    DerivedA a;
    DerivedB b;

    vector<shared_ptr<Base>> temp;
    temp.push_back(make_shared<DerivedA> (a));
temp.push_back(make_shared<DerivedB> (b));

    for(auto ptr : temp)
    ptr->func();
}

The output is

Base func()
Base func()

but what I expected is

Derived A func()
Derived B func()

How could I push the derived class into the base class vector without slicing? If there are no way to solve this problem, are there any equivalent method to store multiple derived class into one array like object?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Make func() as virtual in base class

class Base
{
    public :
        virtual void func()
        {
            cout << "Base func()" << endl;
        }
};
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No slicing is happening. You need to make func virtual in Base:

virtual void func()
{
    cout << "Base func()" << endl;
}

This tells the compiler to look up func for the dynamic type of a Base*.

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You should use virtual functions.

Here is an example of how it works :

virtual_functions.h

#pragma once

class Base {
public:
    virtual void virtual_func();   // virtual function.
    void non_virtual_func();       // non-virtual function.
};

class Derived : public Base {
public:
    void virtual_func();          // virtual function.
    void non_virtual_func();      // non-virtual function.
};

virtual_functions.cpp

#include "virtual_functions.h"

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

void Base::virtual_func() {
    cout << "Base::virtual_func\n";
}

void Base::non_virtual_func() {
    cout << "Base::non_virtual_func()\n";
}


void Derived::virtual_func() {
    cout << "Derived::virtual_func\n";
}

void Derived::non_virtual_func() {
    cout << "Derived::non_virtual_func()\n";
}

main.cpp

#include "virtual_functions.h"

int main() {
    // Declare an object of type Derived.
    Derived aDerived;

    // Declare two pointers,
    // one of type Derived * 
    // and the other of type Base *,
    // and initialize them to point to derived.

    Derived *pDerived = &aDerived;
    Base    *pBase    = &aDerived;

    // Call the functions.
    pBase->virtual_func();        // Call virtual function.
    pBase->non_virtual_func();    // Call nonvirtual function.
    pDerived->virtual_func();     // Call virtual function.
    pDerived->non_virtual_func(); // Call nonvirtual function.

    return 0;
}

Output should be :

Derived::virtual_func()
Base::non_virtual_func()
Derived::virtual_func()
Derived::non_virtual_func()

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