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I'm new to javascript and was trying to refactor some code, clearly there's something I'm missing in javascript that I'd like to learn. This code produces a value once all 5 list boxes have something selected:

function GetTotal() {
        //_listSeverity = document.getElementById("_listSeverity");
        function ParseListBoxvalue(listBox) {
        return parseInt(GetListBoxValue(listBox),10);
        }
        _listSeverity = document.getElementById("<%= _listSeverity.ID %>");
        _listAssociate = document.getElementById("<%= _listAssociateImpact.ID %>");
        _listCustomerImpact = document.getElementById("<%= _listCustomerImpact.ID %>");
        _listRegulatoryImpact = document.getElementById("<%= _listRegulatoryImpact.ID %>");
        _listShareholderImpact = document.getElementById("<%= _listShareholderImpact.ID %>");
        _calculatedTotal = (ParseListBoxvalue(_listAssociate) +
            ParseListBoxvalue(_listSeverity) + ParseListBoxvalue(_listCustomerImpact) 
           +ParseListBoxvalue(_listRegulatoryImpact) + ParseListBoxvalue(_listShareholderImpact)
          )/ 5;
        if (isNaN(_calculatedTotal))
            document.getElementById("_total").innerHTML = "Not enough information";
        else
            document.getElementById("_total").innerHTML = _calculatedTotal;
    }

Then I tried to refactor into a for loop to eliminate some of the code duplication. I tried many methods of if(typeof _calculatedValue !='undefined') I found out on google to see if that could solve it. As I understand it I'm not running into a scope issue here as the only actual scopes are bounded by function(){} declarations. This never produces a value. I realize the / 5 isn't in it yet, but that doesn't seem a reason to me for this to always produce a NaN.

 function GetTotal() {
        //_listSeverity = document.getElementById("_listSeverity");
        function ParseListBoxvalue(listBox) {
        return parseInt(GetListBoxValue(listBox),10);
    }
        var _ListIds=new Array("<%= _listSeverity.ID %>","<%= _listAssociateImpact.ID %>",
            "<%= _listCustomerImpact.ID %>", "<%= _listRegulatoryImpact.ID %>",
            "<%= _listShareholderImpact.ID %>");
//            _calculatedTotal = (ParseListBoxvalue(_listAssociate) +
//                ParseListBoxvalue(_listSeverity) + ParseListBoxvalue(_listCustomerImpact) 
//               +ParseListBoxvalue(_listRegulatoryImpact) + ParseListBoxvalue(_listShareholderImpact)
        //              )/ 5;
        for (i = 0; i < _ListIds.length; i++) {
            if (i==0)
                _calculatedTotal = ParseListBoxvalue(_ListIds[i]);
            else
                _calculatedTotal += ParseListBoxvalue(_ListIds[i]);
        }

        if (isNaN(_calculatedTotal))
            document.getElementById("_total").innerHTML = "Not enough information";
        else
            document.getElementById("_total").innerHTML = _calculatedTotal;
    }

The other function should be of no relevance but here it is :

function GetListBoxValue(listBox) {
        index = listBox.selectedIndex
        try {
            opt = listBox.options[index]
            return opt.value;
        } catch (e) { return null; }

    }

What is wrong with that for loop? or is it something besides the for loop that causes the refactoring to not produce a value?

share|improve this question
1  
btw, why do the condition check every time? wouldn't it be easier to set _calculateTotal = 0 before the loop and then add all of the parsed list box values the same way? – Jonathan Fingland Oct 21 '09 at 11:37
    
@Jonathan +1, that works well, I incorrectly blamed this statement earlier on my problem. As TJ recommended I added a var to your idea. var _calculatedTotal=0; – Maslow Oct 21 '09 at 14:23
up vote 8 down vote accepted

You didn't call document.getElementById():

_calculatedTotal = ParseListBoxvalue(_ListIds[i]);

should be

_calculatedTotal = ParseListBoxvalue(document.getElementById(_ListIds[i]));

and similarly for the other branch.

share|improve this answer
    
after 10 years of not using any dynamically typed languages, I've got some practice and pitfalls ahead of me. – Maslow Oct 21 '09 at 14:22
    
Welcome to freedom :D – Greg Oct 21 '09 at 15:01

Some issues:

  • As Greg said, you didn't call document.getElementById.
  • You're not dividing the total by 5, which the original code did.
  • Be sure to declare your variables (such as i); otherwise, they're globals (see The Horror of Implicit Globals). (The old code was really neglectful about that as well.)
  • Strongly recommend using braces even when there's only one statement in a branch.
share|improve this answer
1  
"Strongly recommend using braces even when there's only one statement in a branch." - why? – Andy E Oct 21 '09 at 11:44
    
Maintainability and clarity. – T.J. Crowder Oct 21 '09 at 11:46
1  
I don't see how. In fact, I think code looks tidier if your not using braces everywhere and I sometimes don't use braces even if there are two statements in a branch. It's a personal preference I would say, and I certainly wouldn't recommend against either (let alone strongly recommending). – Andy E Oct 21 '09 at 11:50
    
@Andy E: My experience (20+ years in brace-style languages) leads me to make a strong recommendation in this regard, but obviously everyone is free to make their own choices (within the confines of project standards). I don't think I can count the number of times I've seen leaving off braces trip people up, but if not using them works for you, great. – T.J. Crowder Oct 21 '09 at 11:56
    
+1 correct answer, and I like the javascript global usage tip. Not sure how I feel about the braces yet. – Maslow Oct 21 '09 at 14:21

Some improvements:

var _calculatedTotal  = ParseListBoxvalue(document.getElementById(_ListIds[0]));
for (var i = 1; i < _ListIds.length; i++) {
 _calculatedTotal += ParseListBoxvalue(document.getElementById(_ListIds[i]));
}

document.getElementById("_total").innerHTML = isNaN(_calculatedTotal) ? "Not enough information" : _calculatedTotal


function GetListBoxValue(listBox) {
 if(listBox.selectedIndex){
 var opt = listBox.options[listBox.selectedIndex]
 }
 return opt ? opt.value : null;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 I like most of your clean up, but it appears var _calculatedTotal = 0; before the for loop works and I like it better. – Maslow Oct 21 '09 at 14:18
    
oh, one of the reasons I had it in a try block is because if there is no item selected listBox.options[listBox.selectedIndex] throws an exception. – Maslow Oct 21 '09 at 14:26
    
Edited, so it will work with non selected too. – Andreas Köberle Oct 21 '09 at 14:50

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