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I'm trying to create a table in SQL Server 2012 Management Studio.

I want to create a table with columns: category, customer, Costume, Payment, and rental.

Here is the SQL I have so far:

CREATE TABLE dbo.CATEGORY
(
    CATEGORY_ID     CHAR(5)     PRIMARY KEY,
    CATEGORY_DESC   CHAR(50)    NOT NULL
);

CREATE TABLE dbo.COSTUME
(
    Costume_ID              CHAR(5), 
    Costume_Desc            CHAR(50), 
    Costume_Size            CHAR(5),
    Costume_RentalPricE     DECIMAL(12,2),
    Category_ID             CHAR(5)
);

CREATE TABLE dbo.CUSTOMER
(
    Customer_ID         CHAR(5),
    Customer_LastName   CHAR(50),
    Customer_FirstName  CHAR(50),
    Customer_Address    CHAR(30),
    Customer_City       CHAR(50),
    Customer_State      CHAR(2),
    Customer_Zip        CHAR(10),
    Customer_Phone      CHAR(10),
    Category_ID         CHAR(5)
);

CREATE TABLE dbo.Payment
(
    Payment_ID          CHAR(5),
    Customer_ID         CHAR(5),
    Payment_Date        DATE,
    Payment_Amount      DECIMAL(12,2),
    Payment_Comment     VARCHAR,
);

CREATE TABLE dbo.Rental
(
    Rental_ID       --it says this needs to be Long integer for field size?
    Customer_ID         CHAR(5),
    Costume_ID          CHAR(5),
    Rental_Date         DATE,   
    Rental_DueDate      DATE,
    Rental_CheckIn      --YES OR NO? i'M NOT SURE HOW TO DO THIS. 
    Rental_Penalty      DECIMAL(12,2)
);

How do I create a Boolean column and a long for fields?

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Comments: I would recommand to use INT for your ID columns - and if you have more than about 5 characters, I would strongly recommend against using CHAR(n) - those strings will be padded with spaces to the defined length, e.g. even if your data is only 1 character long, 50 characters will be stored --> huge waste. Use VARCHAR(n) for anything longer than 5 characters! –  marc_s Apr 15 '13 at 4:43
    
so then using VARCHAR(n) n being 50 or however many I am using correct?? –  Jazzi Apr 15 '13 at 22:42
    
Exactly - in that case, your column can hold up to 50 character - but if you store only 10, then only 10 bytes (plus 2 bytes overhead) are really required. And the string stored is not padded with spaces on the end to the defined length, either. –  marc_s Apr 16 '13 at 4:44

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
USE COSTUMERENTAL;

CREATE TABLE dbo.CATEGORY  -- should always specify schema
(
    CATEGORY_ID       CHAR(5)    PRIMARY KEY, -- can't be two data types
    CATEGORY_DESC     CHAR(50)   NOT NULL
); -- don't need to specify PRIMARY KEY twice

--USE COSTUMER RENTAL; -- is there a space in the name or not?

CREATE TABLE dbo.COSTUME
(
    Costume_ID              CHAR(5), -- need commas
    Costume_Desc            CHAR(50), 
    Costume_Size            CHAR(5),
    Costume_RentalPricE     DECIMAL(12,2), -- Number isn't a valid SQL Server data type  
    Category_ID             CHAR(5)
); -- need closing brackets; also should always use semi-colons to terminate
share|improve this answer
    
Okay that helped a lot –  Jazzi Apr 15 '13 at 1:25

Create table syntax for Server Management Studio:

In Microsoft's SQL Server database, create tables like this:

CREATE TABLE dbo.MYTABLE
(
    my_integer       INTEGER PRIMARY KEY, //int −2,147,483,648 to 2,147,483,647
    my_varchar       VARCHAR(100),        //strings of characters
    my_forcedwidth   CHAR(50),            //fixed width of 50 chars
    my_yes_no        BIT,                 //holds 0 or 1
    my_decimal       DECIMAL(12,2)        //precision number.
    my_bigint        Bigint               //big integer
);

For a full list of datatypes: http://www.connectionstrings.com/sql-server-data-types-reference/

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