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So, I'm just working on C code, particularly a function which accepts 3 arguments: an array, the size of the array, and the number of max elements you want returned.

Here's my code:

int* findMaxElements(int base_array[],int size_of_base_array, int number_of_elements_to_find);

int main( void )
{

    printf("Find Max Values in an Array\n\n");

    // Set up array

    int kinch[6] = {1,2,3,4,5,6};

    // Pass to function and get a pointer to new array filled with only the max elements

    int *given = findMaxElements(kinch,6,3);

    for(int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    {
        printf("\nMax Value = %d\n", *(given + i));
    }
    return 0;

}

int* findMaxElements(int base_array[],int size_of_base_array, int number_of_elements_to_find)
{

    // Set up all initial variables

    int i,k,c,position;
    int maximum = 0;



    int returnArray[100];

    /*Actual Algorythm */

    for(i = 0; i < number_of_elements_to_find; i++)
    {

        // Get the max value in the base array

        for(k = 0; k < size_of_base_array; k++)
        {
            if(base_array[k] > maximum)
            {
                maximum = base_array[k];
            }
        }

        // Find the position of the max value

        for(position = 0; position < size_of_base_array; position++)
        {

            if(base_array[position] == maximum)
            {
                break;
            }

        }

        // Delete the maximum value from the array and shift everything

        for(c = position - 1; c < size_of_base_array - 1; c++)
        {
            base_array[c] = base_array[c+1];
        }

        // Reduce the size of the array

        size_of_base_array -= 1;

        // Push max value into return array

        returnArray[i] = maximum;

        // Reset max value

        maximum = 0;
    }

    return returnArray;

}

I have a feeling somewhere in the function something goes wrong.

// Set up array

    int kinch[6] = {1,2,3,4,5,6};

    // Pass to function and get a pointer to new array filled with only the max elements

    int *given = findMaxElements(kinch,6,3);

    for(int i = 0; i < 3; i++)
    {
        printf("\nMax Value = %d\n", *(given + i));
    }

This should output the numbers 6, 5, and 4, because they are the three largest in the array, however the output I get is always 6, 6, and 6. What's wrong with it?

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

This may not be your only problem, but in the lines

for(c = position - 1; c < size_of_base_array - 1; c++)
    {
        base_array[c] = base_array[c+1];
    }

You copy the element at [c+1] (which is the maximum) to [c] - so you keep finding the max...

You should start the loop with c = position, not c = position - 1.

And add keyword static in front of the array you use to store the return values, so they remain valid (this is one way to address the issue that Jonathan Leffler identified).

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2  
Array overflow is also a problem. I would recommend passing in an array to receive the return values. Using a static array is certainly a one-word change solution that 'works', but it means that you prevent the code from being re-entrant. Only one call can be in progress at a time, and the latest call 'wins'. –  Jonathan Leffler Apr 14 '13 at 22:10
1  
@JonathanLeffler you are right. The allocation of an array of 100 elements "just to be on the safe side", and not checking that number_of_elements_to_find is less than 100, is a problem waiting to happen; I like the solution of having the space allocated by the calling routine. –  Floris Apr 14 '13 at 22:18
    
Thanks guys. I modified the code and it now works. I also made an extra parameter to the function that will store the maximum values, and got rid of the allocation of 100 elements in the local array. –  turnt Apr 14 '13 at 22:24
    
happy to help. It's good when you learn more than one thing from a single question... :-) –  Floris Apr 14 '13 at 22:28
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The whole approach to find the Kth largest element is not efficient and elegant. I will suggest you to modify your algorithm, although with above suggestions it will work fine, but it's not good way to solve this problem.

I will suggest you to look into below link to modify your algorithm http://www.geeksforgeeks.org/k-largestor-smallest-elements-in-an-array/

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I agree this is not a great algorithm, but I think it's more a "learn to program" exercise than a "write efficient algorithm" exercise. Helpful link - I have bookmarked it! –  Floris Apr 14 '13 at 21:58
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One problem is that you are returning a pointer to a local variable, returnArray, in the function. You can't do that reliably — it leads to undefined behaviour.

There may well be other problems too, but that's enough to be a show-stopper on its own.

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1  
+1 for finding that issue - if you don't mind, I included a solution to that issue with my "and your algorithm breaks here" answer (with reference to your answer). Not sure what the correct etiquette is for that. If I shouldn't have done that please let me know. –  Floris Apr 14 '13 at 21:44
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