Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to get a variable that contains the WiFi signal strength. The following command return successfully when executed from the terminal

iwconfig wlan0 |grep Signal| cut -d"=" -f3 |cut -d" " -f1

Returns 74/100

But, when I put this into a system() call, I get the following compile error.

int main (){
system("iwconfig wlan0 |grep Signal| cut -d"=" -f3 |cut -d" " -f1");
return 0;
}

When I compile that...

$ c++ wifi.cc wifi.cc: In function ‘int main()’:

wifi.cc:8:59: error: assignment of read-only location ‘"iwconfig $_[0]|grep Signal|cut -d"’

wifi.cc:8:59: error: incompatible types in assignment of ‘const char [16]’ to ‘const char [34]’

Any ideas/suggestions are very appreciated.

share|improve this question
    
You may want to use popen to get the output of your command; you still will need to escape the command string. –  Basile Starynkevitch Apr 15 '13 at 5:22

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

It's because your string literal has unescaped quotation marks in it. You need to escape them:

system("iwconfig wlan0 |grep Signal| cut -d\"=\" -f3 |cut -d\" \" -f1");

In your incorrect code, the quotation marks are being paired up like this:

system("iwconfig wlan0 |grep Signal| cut -d"=" -f3 |cut -d" " -f1");
       ^                                   ^ ^            ^ ^    ^
       └─────────────────1─────────────────┘ └──────2─────┘ └─3──┘

As you can see, there are three separate string literals. After you escape the quotation marks, there is only a single pair of quotes as far as C++ is concerned:

system("iwconfig wlan0 |grep Signal| cut -d\"=\" -f3 |cut -d\" \" -f1");
       ^                                                             ^
       └──────────────────────────────1──────────────────────────────┘

The escaped quotes (those with \ in front of them) are just part of the string.

However, in the terminal the command is not part of some string. It is just a command on its own and the quotations are paired up like so:

iwconfig wlan0 |grep Signal| cut -d"=" -f3 |cut -d" " -f1
                                   ^ ^            ^ ^
                                   └1┘            └2┘
share|improve this answer
    
That did it. I'm still scratching my head as to why that would work with on the terminal...may thanks! –  loopifnil Apr 14 '13 at 22:13
    
@newtoxcode Because in the terminal it's not part of a string literal. The quotation marks don't need to be escaped. –  Joseph Mansfield Apr 14 '13 at 22:13
    
@newtoxcode See my edit. It should make it clearer. –  Joseph Mansfield Apr 14 '13 at 22:18

You need to escape the " like so \":

system("iwconfig wlan0 |grep Signal| cut -d\"=\" -f3 |cut -d\" \" -f1");

Otherwise what you have in the first case is:

"iwconfig wlan0 |grep Signal| cut -d" = " -f3 |cut -d"
                                     ^^^

which is trying to assign to a string literal, which is where the error assignment of read-only location is coming from.

share|improve this answer
    
That did it. I'm still scratching my head as to why that would work with on the terminal...may thanks! –  loopifnil Apr 14 '13 at 22:13

if you're strings are simple enough and you want to avoid escape-hell, you could also use single-quotes in the shell-command, e.g.:

system("iwconfig wlan0 |grep Signal| cut -d'=' -f3 |cut -d' ' -f1");

this only works because in shell you can use both double-quotes and single-quotes for string literals (there are differences between the two, but let us not bother about them now).

apart from that i would suggest to use library calls rather than executing terminal programs. this should make your program faster (as you don't have to call an external program which calls a library to get some value and prints that; only for you to parse the printout and try to read the correct value), and more robust (e.g. if the output of iwconfig changes because of a new version or simply because it is running under a different language; or you are having multiple wireless connections, or...)

have a look at at libiw

share|improve this answer

You need to use an escape sequence to add the quotation marks inside of the string like this:

system("iwconfig wlan0 |grep Signal| cut -d\"=\" -f3 |cut -d\" \" -f1");
//                                         ^^ ^^            ^^ ^^
share|improve this answer
    
That did it. I'm still scratching my head as to why that would work with on the terminal...may thanks! –  loopifnil Apr 14 '13 at 22:13

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.