Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a class with an const abstract member. Since it is abstract, the object must reside in a higher scope. However, it may be edited in this higher scope. I have made this MWE, and added comments explaining what I am trying to achieve (.i.e. I know this does NOT achieve what I want).

Besides commenting the hell out of it, what can be done to stop the user from editing the object. Preferably, an idiot proof method (optimally, compile error)

#include <iostream>

class Foo
{
    private:
        const int * p_abstract_const;   
        //int my application this is a pointer to abstract object
    public:
        Foo(const int * p_new_concrete_const)
        {
            p_abstract_const  = p_new_concrete_const;
        }

        void printX()
        {
            std::cout << *p_abstract_const << std::endl;
        }
};

int main()
{
    int concrete_nonconst = 666;
    Foo foo(&concrete_nonconst);    // I want this NOT to compile
  //const int concrete_const(1);
  //Foo foo(&concrete_const);       // only this should compile 
    foo.printX();
    concrete_nonconst=999;          // so that this will NOT be possible
    foo.printX();

}
share|improve this question
    
Don't take a reference, make a copy. That way, the calling code will not have access to the original object. –  Mats Petersson Apr 14 '13 at 22:19
1  
@MatsPetersson How can I do that when the member is abstract? –  aiao Apr 14 '13 at 22:20
    
what exactly do you mean by abstract?the member is a native type (int) not a class –  Heisenbug Apr 14 '13 at 22:21
4  
You have int concrete_nonconst = 666; and then concrete_nonconst=999; // so that this will NOT be possible. You can't prevent this as it would be against language standard - non-const variable can be modified. What are you trying to achieve, there is likely a better way? –  Zdeslav Vojkovic Apr 14 '13 at 22:22
1  
@FKaria I think that this will declare a const pointer to a non-const int. Someone please second this notion –  aiao Apr 14 '13 at 22:47

1 Answer 1

You can make your non-const int* constructor private without providing an implementation:

class Foo
{
    private:
        const int * p_abstract_const;   
        //int my application this is a pointer to abstract object
        Foo(int * p_new_concrete_const);

    public:
        Foo(const int * p_new_concrete_const)
        {
            p_abstract_const  = p_new_concrete_const;
        }
        void printX()
        {
            std::cout << *p_abstract_const << std::endl;
        }
};
int main()
{
    int concrete_nonconst = 666;
    Foo foo(&concrete_nonconst);    // This won't compile
    const int concrete_const(1);
    Foo foo(&concrete_const);       // But this will
    foo.printX();


    concrete_nonconst=999;          // so that this will NOT be possible
    foo.printX();
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.