Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to create a matrix from a given vector in R, but I don't know how to achieve it in simple ways. I am giving an example below. The matrix was made using the "cbind" function.

Given x as

[1,] 1
[2,] 3
[3,] 4

how can I create the matrix below with simple method?

     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6]
[1,]    1    0    0    0    0    0
[2,]    3    1    0    0    0    0
[3,]    4    3    1    0    0    0
[4,]    0    4    3    1    0    0
[5,]    0    0    4    3    1    0
[6,]    0    0    0    4    3    1
[7,]    0    0    0    0    4    3
[8,]    0    0    0    0    0    4

Thank you for your help!

share|improve this question
    
Does this have a language associated with it or is this a math question? –  Kermit Apr 14 '13 at 23:02
    
Sorry for the ambiguous question, now it's clear. I am trying to do this in R. –  user1618083 Apr 14 '13 at 23:08

4 Answers 4

Using append and sapply

sapply(0:5, append, x = rep(0,5), values = c(1,3,4))

#      [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6]
# [1,]    1    0    0    0    0    0
# [2,]    3    1    0    0    0    0
# [3,]    4    3    1    0    0    0
# [4,]    0    4    3    1    0    0
# [5,]    0    0    4    3    1    0
# [6,]    0    0    0    4    3    1
# [7,]    0    0    0    0    4    3
# [8,]    0    0    0    0    0    4
share|improve this answer
    
Very nice solution, naming other arguments so that the iterator goes to the after argument in append. –  Matthew Lundberg Apr 15 '13 at 2:30
matrix(c(1,3,4,rep(0,6)),ncol=6,nrow=8)

You'll get a warning, but the correct matrix. If you don't like the warning just use suppressWarnings:

suppressWarnings(matrix(c(1,3,4,rep(0,6)),ncol=6,nrow=8))

Of course, be careful with that function if you are trying to abstract this to more general cases.

share|improve this answer

This method is very intuitive:

x <- c(1,3,4)
n <- 6
m <- matrix(0,ncol=n,nrow=n+length(x)-1)
diag(m) <- 1
diag(m[-1,]) <- 3
diag(m[-c(1, 2),]) <- 4

Assigning along diagonals can be automated easily, for example with a 'for' loop

for(i in seq_along(x)) diag(m[1:n + i - 1,]) <- x[i]

Both approaches yield:

R> m
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6]
[1,]    1    0    0    0    0    0
[2,]    3    1    0    0    0    0
[3,]    4    3    1    0    0    0
[4,]    0    4    3    1    0    0
[5,]    0    0    4    3    1    0
[6,]    0    0    0    4    3    1
[7,]    0    0    0    0    4    3
[8,]    0    0    0    0    0    4
share|improve this answer
1  
It would look a lot better if the vector x were used in the solution (e.g., use a loop which performs the diag<- assignments). –  Matthew Lundberg Apr 15 '13 at 2:36
    
@MatthewLundberg, added a for-loop implementation of the solution. –  Ryogi Apr 15 '13 at 2:45
    
Thank you guys, all of these solutions work for me. The method by mnel is really elegant!! –  user1618083 Apr 15 '13 at 4:42

This works. (edit: no votes, maybe too telegraphic?) The idea is to create an all-zero matrix with the appropriate dimensions, and then use row/column arithmetic (using the row() and col() functions) to fill in the desired values in the elements where row-column is between 0 and 2 (i.e. the diagonal and the first two lower off-diagonals). This does rely on the column-major structure of matrices in R ...

x <- c(1,3,4)
n <- 6
m <- matrix(0,ncol=n,nrow=n+length(x)-1)
betw <- function(x,a,b) x>=a & x<= b
m[betw(row(m)-col(m),0,2)] <- x
share|improve this answer
    
And lots of recycling in the final assignment. Yes, the better explanation of the idea really helps. –  Matthew Lundberg Apr 15 '13 at 2:57

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.