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I'm very new to Java, and I can't seem to figure out why my code is not working. In theory, it should print out the distance between (0.0) and whatever I plug into the class. Can someone help me out please?

public class Homework61 {
    double x;
    double y;

    Homework61(double q, double r) {
        double x = q;
        double y = r;
    }

    Homework61() {
        x = 0.0;
        y = 0.0;
    }

    public String toString() {
        String a = "(" + x + "," + y + ")";
        return a;
    }

    public double distanceFromOrigin()

    {
        double z = Math.sqrt(Math.pow(x, 2) + Math.pow(y, 2));
        return z;
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // TODO Auto-generated method stub
        Homework61 p = new Homework61();
        System.out.println(p.toString() + " Is this far from origin: "
                + p.distanceFromOrigin());
        p = new Homework61(3, 4);
        p.x = 3;
        p.y = 4;
        System.out.println(p.toString() + " Is this far from origin: "
                + p.distanceFromOrigin());
    }
}
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Once you define a variable, you do not need to re-define its type (ex in double x = q;) –  JCOC611 Apr 15 '13 at 2:50

2 Answers 2

Homework61(double q, double r) {
    double x = q;
    double y = r;
}

creates 2 local variable x and y then does nothing with them. You probably mean

Homework61(double q, double r) {
    this.x = q;
    this.y = r;
}

Plus you only ever print the distance before you populate your objects (x and y are always 0).

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That was exactly what I needed! Thank you John! –  ACH Apr 15 '13 at 2:52
    
I'd prefer public constructors unless the class is not meant to be instantiated. –  Sri Harsha Chilakapati Apr 15 '13 at 3:36
double x;
double y;

Homework61(double q, double r) {
        double x = q;
        double y = r;
    }

In the above case even through you have x and y class variable, Inside the constructor Homework61 again with the same name you are creating x and y local variables whose life will exits at the end of the constructor curly brackets.

if you want the receiving parameter values to be initialized in the declared x and y class variables use this pointer.

this pointer is used to differentiate between local and class variables, i.e it prevents the ambiguity between local variables and class variables

Therefore you have to initialize it like

Homework61(double q, double r) {
    this.x = q;
    this.y = r;
}
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