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I'm not exactly sure what makes a tree complete but I need to figure out if my tree is complete or not, so what I'm doing is making sure that each part of the tree is balanced. If a tree is entirely balanced does that make it complete?

template<typename TYPE>
bool BinarySearchTree<TYPE>::CompleteTree()
{
    return PCompleteTree(TRoot);
}

template<typename TYPE>
bool BinarySearchTree<TYPE>::PCompleteTree(Node<TYPE>* root)
{
    bool isComplete= false;
    if(root)
    {
        if(abs(PHeight(root->left) - PHeight(root->right)) >= 1)
            isComplete = ((PCompleteTree(root->left)) && (PCompleteTree(root->right)));
        else
            isComplete = false;
    }
    return isComplete;
}
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closed as not a real question by StilesCrisis, Gangnus, Nicholas Wilson, Guru, Sumit Singh Apr 15 '13 at 11:07

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
There are at least two different definitions of "complete binary tree", see e.g. [en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_tree](Wikipedia). You use neither one. Balanced does not mean complete. –  n.m. Apr 15 '13 at 3:02
3  
Not sure if OP is trolling, but why does this seems okay to you? "I'm not exactly sure what makes a tree complete but I need to figure out if my tree is complete or not" How do you expect to solve the problem if you can't even define the things in the problem? That's like asking someone "bleezal strab blegh?" and having them say "I don't know what those words mean but is the answer 4?" I'm really having a hard time believing this as a serious question. –  roliu Apr 15 '13 at 3:26
    
A binary tree is complete if for every sequence of binary trees {b_i}, if for every N there is an M such that for each i,j>M, d(b_i, b_j)<1/N, then there is a binary tree B such that for every N there is an M such that for all i > M, d(b_i, B) < 1/N. Wait, that's not quite right... –  Yakk Apr 15 '13 at 3:33
    
If everyone agrees the question is un-answerable, why aren't you voting to close (like I did)? –  StilesCrisis Apr 15 '13 at 3:53
    
@n.m.: Two definitions? I see only one. The "except possibly the last" is not a variation. It implies that the set of perfect binary trees is a subset of the complete binary trees. –  MSalters Apr 15 '13 at 8:40

3 Answers 3

A complete binary tree is when every level, except possibly the last, is completely filled with all nodes as far left as possible. So there may be instances where a balanced binary tree may not also mean a complete binary tree.

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Suppose we adopt the definition of complete binary tree that is shown in a nist.gov webpage:

Definition: A binary tree in which every level, except possibly the deepest, is completely filled. At depth n, the height of the tree, all nodes must be as far left as possible.

The NIST link shown above is the source for wikipedia's definition of complete binary tree in its binary tree article. The NIST webpage points out that a complete binary tree (of height n) has 2ᵏ nodes at every depth k < n, and between 2ⁿ and 2ⁿ⁺¹-1 nodes altogether.

It is true that the root of a nondegenerate complete binary tree with n levels has as its left subtree a complete binary tree of n-1 levels, and a right subtree that is a complete binary tree of n-1 (or possibly n-2) levels. However, the height test in your code looks miscoded: it apparently sets isComplete = false when the height-difference is zero. Instead, it should report false if the left height is less than the right height or if the left subtree is more than one level higher than the right subtree, or if either subtree is incomplete.

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That is insufficient. [ [[],] , [[],] ] is not complete, yet the left subtree is complete, the right subtree is complete, and the left and right subtree have the same height. –  Yakk Apr 15 '13 at 4:44
    
@Yakk, due to limited time, I didn't spell out how to test for completeness – ie, I avoided saying when to return true, and merely meant to indicate some cases where the tree is not complete. Derp, note that in Yakk's example, the empty leaves start in the left subtree, but the right subtree again has a leaf, so the filled-to-left criterion is violated. –  jwpat7 Apr 15 '13 at 5:13

I'll use this definition from nist.gov via @jwpat7

Definition: A binary tree in which every level, except possibly the deepest, is completely filled. At depth n, the height of the tree, all nodes must be as far left as possible.

Now, a recursive definition is aided by a definition of "perfect":

I'll use 'perfect' to mean "every level is full, or empty". A tree is full if both the left and right subtrees are perfect, and they have equal depth.

Then we can define complete recursively as follows:

A tree is complete (by the above definition) if it is perfect, or if the left and right subtrees are the same height and the left is perfect and the right is complete, or if the left subtree is one deeper than the right and the right is perfect and the left is complete.

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