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If .when is the equivalent of an "and" operator for JQuery Promises, what's the equivalent of an "Or" operator?

If I have two Promises, and I would like to do something when both have resolved, then I should use the "when" method. However I have a scenario, where I would like to do something when either one promise or the other has resolved.

The scenario is database initialisation. The first promise is connected to checking to see if a database already exists. The second promise comes from creating a database if the first promise is rejected. I would then like to run some code that is conditional on either the first promise having been resolved or the second.

At the moment my code looks a little like this:

function initialiseDB() {
    var deferred = jQuery.Deferred();

    // Check to see if the database exists already
    var existencePromise = checkExistenceOfDatabase();

    existencePromise.done(function() {
        // The database exists; no need to pull a copy
        deferred.resolve(); 
    });
    existencePromise.fail( function(error) {
        // Failed to confirm existence of database; pull a copy
        var pullPromise = pullDatabase();

        pullPromise.fail( function(error) {
            // Failed to pull database
            deferred.reject();
        });
        pullPromise.done( function() {
            // A copy of the database has been pulled
            deferred.resolve();
        });
    });

    return deferred.promise();
}

This is effectively a custom "lazy-or" operator.

I am new to JQuery's Promises and I spent quite a while looking for a generic "Or" method. Is the code above how it's supposed to be done, or is there a generic form that I missed?

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1  
Don't see any evident problem with your code. Just remember that deferred.reject() with call any failCallbacks added to the deferred. Also, there is no OR method for the deferred, you hace to handle each scenario (done, fail) separately. –  ricardohdz Apr 15 '13 at 3:28
    
create events & trigger when promise is resolved –  mikakun Apr 15 '13 at 3:29
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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Matthew, your code will simplify to :

function initialiseDB() {
    var deferred = jQuery.Deferred();
    checkExistenceOfDatabase().done(deferred.resolve).fail(function(error) {
        pullDatabase().fail(deferred.reject).done(deferred.resolve);
    });
    return deferred.promise();
}

I'm pretty certain it will simplify further to :

function initialiseDB() {
    return checkExistenceOfDatabase().then(null, function(error) {
        return pullDatabase();
    });
}

or very concisely :

function initialiseDB() {
    return checkExistenceOfDatabase().then(null, pullDatabase);
}

Although the nett effect is or-like, it's really sequential logic ... which is exactly what you want; ie pullDatabase should only be called if checkExistenceOfDatabase() has failed.

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1  
That last one-line version is gold. I've checked it against all the possible cases and it's exactly what I was after. Thank you greatly. –  Matthew Walker Apr 15 '13 at 8:48
    
I confess to feeling rather pleased about that Matthew. One-line are always satisfying, and one-liners that actually work even more so. –  Beetroot-Beetroot Apr 15 '13 at 11:24
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Here's a function you could try - let's call it whenAny:

var whenAny = function() {
  var finish = $.Deferred();
  $.each(arguments, function(index, def){
    def.done(finish.resolve);
  });
  return finish.promise();
}

Usage: whenAny(def1, def2, def3).

You may have to tweak things here and there a bit, perhaps with regards to argument passing, figuring out which one actually resolved, etc, but you get the idea.

Thanks for bringing up this use case... I think I might actually add this into simply-deferred. Seems pretty useful.

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