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This code was presented in my Computer Science class today (accompanying several questions irrelevant to this post). This is not homework, just some issues I personally found with the code;

public class CloneClass implements Cloneable {
    private Element element ;

    public CloneClass ( Element newElement ) {
        element = newElement ;
    }

    public CloneClass clone () {
        try {
            // I don't understand this
            CloneClass copy = ( CloneClass ) super.clone ();
            // or this
            copy.element = element.clone ();

            return copy ;
        } catch ( CloneNotSupportedException e ) {
            return null ;
        }
    }
}

Firstly;

CloneClass copy = ( CloneClass ) super.clone ();

We know that the super is Object (since there's no explicit extension) and that super.clone() must return an instance of CloneClass (it can't return an Object instance, since that's abstract, and it's being downcast to CloneClass, so it must be a CloneClass or descendant instance).
My question; how does super.clone() know to return a CloneClass instance?

Secondly;

copy.element = element.clone ();

How is it possible to directly refer to copy.element like that; it's declared as private!
It's not an attribute of the current class, it's an attribute of another instance (that happens to be the same class)

Thirdly;

} catch ( CloneNotSupportedException e ) {

Why is this needed? Is this incase Element doesn't extend Cloneable?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted

how does super.clone() know to return a CloneClass instance?

Even within a super method, this still points to the same object, so this.getClass() will give you CloneClass (or even a subclass).

How is it possible to directly refer to copy.element like that; it's declared as private!

You can access private fields not just of this, but also of other instances of the same class. It is only private to other classes.

Why is this needed? Is this incase Element doesn't extend Cloneable?

Because CloneClass may not extend Cloneable (which it obviously does, but because of how this API has been designed with Object#clone throwing CloneNotSupportedException, the compiler cannot make this connection).

This is a bit of an ugly design wart in Java. Object has a clone method, but Object itself is not Cloneable (which is a marker interface). So you can call the method on objects that don't support it. Similar thing with Serializable.

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I'm not sure I understand "Even within a super method, this still points to the same object, so this.getClass() will give you CloneClass (or even a subclass)." Does this mean if the superclass (Object, in this case) had a method that returned this.getClass() and you called it from CloneClass, it'd return CloneClass? (even though it's a method in the super?) –  Anti Earth Apr 15 '13 at 4:40
2  
Yes. this always points to the current actual instance. You'll get CloneClass. –  Thilo Apr 15 '13 at 4:42
    
Ohhh, so the super is really only there to make Java lookup the field there. It's still 'part' of the same instance? Thanks a bunch! –  Anti Earth Apr 15 '13 at 4:43
1  
In your case super is used to call the implementation of the method in the super class. This is a common pattern to extend an implementation when overriding a method. With clone() instead of super.clone() you'd end up with infinite recursion (the method just calling itself all over again). –  Thilo Apr 15 '13 at 4:47

Object#clone signature is

protected Object clone() throws CloneNotSupportedException

It copying any mutable objects that comprise the internal "deep structure" of the object being cloned and return the Object, so you need to cast it your Object type that is CloneClass.

copy.element = element.clone ();

You can refer private field as because you are in same class it self.

} catch ( CloneNotSupportedException e ) {

Object#clone throws CloneNotSupportedException if the object's class does not support the Cloneable interface. Subclasses that override the clone method can also throw this exception to indicate that an instance cannot be cloned.

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is CloneNotSupportedException a runtime exception? –  Anti Earth Apr 15 '13 at 4:37
    
No it is not.... –  Subhrajyoti Majumder Apr 15 '13 at 4:37
    
So why do I have to have a try and catch block? Shouldn't the code itself just not compile if Element didn't implement Cloneable?? –  Anti Earth Apr 15 '13 at 4:38
    
Yes you have to as it is Checked Exception. Compiler will not ask to implement but if you do not then it will raise the Exception –  Subhrajyoti Majumder Apr 15 '13 at 4:40
    
Why? :/ It seems like a fairly silly design –  Anti Earth Apr 15 '13 at 4:44

1) Object.clone API states that for any object x, x.clone().getClass() == x.getClass() is true

2) It is possible to access to private copy.element because we access it in the same class

3) If Element does not implement Cloneable, element.clone() will throw CloneNotSupportedException, it will be caught and null returned

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I don't think 1) answers anything at all; I'm more curious that x.super.clone().getClass() == x.getClass() –  Anti Earth Apr 15 '13 at 4:42
// I don't understand this
CloneClass copy = ( CloneClass ) super.clone ();

Constructs a copy of this object, by bitwise copy for all its members, both primitives and reference types.

// or this
copy.element = element.clone ();

See above. Before this line, copy.element points to the same object as this.element. This line clones it so they now point to different elements, so the clone of this is now completely independent of this.

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