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I have two function which implement encoding and decoding respectively:

void
delta_encode (char *buffer, const unsigned int length)
{
 char delta = 0;
 char original;
 unsigned int i;
 for (i = 0; i < length; ++i)
 {
  original = buffer[i];
  buffer[i] -= delta;
  delta = original;
 }
}

void
delta_decode (char *buffer, const unsigned int length)
{
 char delta = 0;
 unsigned int i;
 for (i = 0; i < length; ++i)
 {
  buffer[i] += delta;
  delta = buffer[i];
 }
}

The thing I don't like about those is that they are quite alike, except for the += versus -= part. Is there a way to unite them into one function, which would ask the user whether he wants to encode or decode, and choose a -= or += version respectively. And if there is, what will the code for it look like? If there are several ways to do this, which is the best?

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5  
Personally, I would prefer them as individual functions. It's clear from the name what each one does. Don't be fooled into thinking that all code duplication is bad. You need to draw the line between what is sensible and what is ridiculous. –  paddy Apr 15 '13 at 4:31
1  
@JimBalter - yes, I decided not to point out the "hidden tag": "What..." –  Floris Apr 15 '13 at 4:53
2  
Then what the heck did you have in mind? Pointless complication, code unreadability, a maintenance nightmare, and a greatly increased chance of bugs? (e.g., Michael Liberman's solution is broken.) –  Jim Balter Apr 15 '13 at 5:00
1  
In that sense Anish's solution is the least objectionable - he keeps the original functions intact, just wraps them in an outer "shell of unity". But since decoding and encoding are fundamentally different operations, I'm not sure of the logical value of doing this. It's not like overloading a function - same functionality with different parameters deserves same function name; different functionality, not so much. Still we are learning from the exercise, I think. –  Floris Apr 15 '13 at 5:05
2  
"Something in the language that might be suitable just for this kind of generalistion." -- In the language? What sort of thing could that be? "I only intended it to be read by me" -- You'll be a different person in 6 months and won't be able to read your own code. Do what competent professionals have learned to do ... always code as if it will be read by others. –  Jim Balter Apr 15 '13 at 5:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If you have the same code but for a sign, you could add a encode/decode parameter to your function call, and multiply the thing you are adding by -1 if you have the encode version. Thus:

typedef enum {ENCODE = -1; DECODE = 1;} CODE_TYPE;

void delta_code(char *buffer, const unsigned int length, CODE_TYPE e);

void delta_code(char *buffer, const unsigned int length, CODE_TYPE e) 
  {
  char delta = 0;
  char original;
  unsigned int i;
  for (i = 0; i < length; ++i)
    {
    original = buffer[i];
    buffer[i] += delta*e;
    delta = (e<0)?original:buffer[i];
    }
  }
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1  
wow) didn't think about, but this looks even closer to what I envisioned as an answer: short, unifying and apparently complicated –  Chiffa Apr 15 '13 at 5:11

As long as this is an "intellectual exercise", I might as well post this, which captures the symmetry of encode/decode:

#include <stdbool.h>

void delta_code(char *buffer, const unsigned int length, bool encode) 
{
    char delta = 0;
    unsigned int i;
    for (i = 0; i < length; ++i)
    {
        char next_delta;
        if (encode)
        {
            next_delta = buffer[i];
            buffer[i] -= delta;
        }
        else
        {
            buffer[i] += delta;
            next_delta = buffer[i];
        }
        delta = next_delta;
    }
}

Edit: The OP referred to language features. If C had a generalized postfix subtract, say =- that worked like postfix -- in that it returned the value of the left side before the subtraction, then you could do this:

   for (i = 0; i < length; ++i)
       delta = encode? (buffer[i] =- delta) : (buffer[i] += delta);

Of course, in real C you could do

      char temp;
      for (i = 0; i < length; ++i)
          delta = encode? (temp = buffer[i], buffer[i] -= delta, temp) : (buffer[i] += delta);
share|improve this answer
    
I like the symmetry of this code. –  Floris Apr 15 '13 at 5:23
    
I like the visual symmetry too, but I hoped to deal with the whole +\- thing. –  Chiffa Apr 15 '13 at 5:26
    
It can't both be symmetric and fold +/- together because encode and decode have two differences, one being + vs. - and the other being whether the delta is the old value or the new value. And the point of this isn't the visual symmetry (although that falls out nicely), but the logical symmetry ... you can see precisely how encode and decode differ. –  Jim Balter Apr 15 '13 at 5:30
    
Yes, and as a "delta-oriented" solution it is quite good, I think. –  Chiffa Apr 15 '13 at 5:33
    
Now, after all this discussion I realise that the last part of that question is probably the very thing I expected to see as an answer. So thanks for that. –  Chiffa Apr 15 '13 at 13:01

I agree with everyone who said doing this is bad. It makes your program less efficient and your code clunkier (thereby reducing readability). If you ever encounter such a roadblock while implementing a design, you might want to re-think your design and why such a requirement even exists.

All that being said, you could do something like this:

typedef enum
{
    ENCODE,
    DECODE
} CONTEXT;

void
delta_operation (char *buffer, const unsigned int length, CONTEXT context)
{
    if(context == ENCODE)
    {
        char delta = 0;
        char original;
        unsigned int i;
        for (i = 0; i < length; ++i)
        {
            original = buffer[i];
            buffer[i] -= delta;
            delta = original;
        }
    }
    else if(context == DECODE)
    {
        char delta = 0;
        unsigned int i;
        for (i = 0; i < length; ++i)
        {
            buffer[i] += delta;
            delta = buffer[i];
        }
    }
}

And call it like:

char buffer[] = "Whatever your buffer is supposed to be";
delta_operation (buffer, strlen(buffer), ENCODE);
share|improve this answer
    
Well, I explained the why earlier, and, simply put, it might be "to see if I can". But I see the more general considerations, thanks. –  Chiffa Apr 15 '13 at 5:21

Personally I agree with @paddy. You should not make your code unreadable just to get less code lines.

In general if you want to switch between += and -= you can use (+/-1) multiplier. For += you should use multiplier = 1 and then you will get:

buffer[i] = buffer[i] + multiplier * delta ==> buffer[i] = buffer[i] + delta

and for the -= you can use multiplier = -1 and then you will get:

buffer[i] = buffer[i] + multiplier * delta ==> buffer[i] = buffer[i] - delta

Specifically for you code it could look something like that (you can use boolean instead of int and asign the value in the function):

void
delta_encode_decode (char *buffer, const unsigned int length, int shouldDecode)
{
 char delta = 0;
 char original;
 unsigned int i;
 for (i = 0; i < length; ++i)
 {
  original = buffer[i];
  buffer[i] = buffer[i] + shouldDecode * delta;

  if (shouldDecode == 1)
    delta = buffer[i];
  else
    delta = original;

 }
}

OR more "elegant" solution (contribution of Anish Ram):

typedef enum
{
    ENCODE = -1,
    DECODE = 1
} eOperation;

and use the eOperation instead of the hardcoded values of -1/+1 and the int parameter

share|improve this answer
    
Well, this perhaps is what I wanted: still quite clear, but shorter. –  Chiffa Apr 15 '13 at 4:47
    
@Chiffa, Well suppose you need another function in the future, whose functionality differs from that of encode/decode by some other lines, then your maintainability will decrease if using this method. This is why, in my answer, I used an enum and then your generic function does different stuff based on the argument. –  Anish Ramaswamy Apr 15 '13 at 4:50
    
Yes, I agree that your solution is more general in this sense, but for just two functions the question is about I like the "multiplier solution" more. –  Chiffa Apr 15 '13 at 4:54
    
My solution - without having seen the other two as I was writing it - seems to combine the best of both worlds - I use an enum for clarity, but use values of -1, +1 to use them directly as a multiplier... I do think the code as written here has a problem - it seems shouldDecode must be either -1 or +1, and the test if(shouldDecode) will be true in either case. –  Floris Apr 15 '13 at 4:56
1  
Glad to see the test changed to if (shouldDecode == 1)... you're welcome. –  Floris Apr 15 '13 at 5:07

Here's something nobody else seems to have suggested yet. You can make a kernel function to do the operation on a single character and pass it in.

typedef void (*delta_op)( char *value, char *delta );

void encode( char *value, char *delta )
{
    char prev = *value;
    *value += *delta;
    *delta = prev;
}

void decode( char *value, char *delta )
{
    *value -= *delta;
    *delta = *value;
}

Then you just pass your kernel function to the main part.

void encode_decode( char *buffer, unsigned int length, encode_op operation )
{
    char delta = 0;
    unsigned int i;
    for (i = 0; i < length; ++i)
    {
        operation( &buffer[i], &delta );
    }
}

So you call like this:

encode_decode( buffer, length, encode );
encode_decode( buffer, length, decode );

It'll be clunky and slow though.... like qsort. Because of all the function calls.

share|improve this answer
    
But it doesn't combine the +/- logic, which is what the OP was looking for. Floris's answer manages that, with some pain ... but see the bottom of my answer, which manages it in a fantasy version of C. –  Jim Balter Apr 15 '13 at 5:56
    
On second thought, I don't combine +/- ... only Floris manages that. –  Jim Balter Apr 15 '13 at 6:20

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