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Suppose I have the following C++ function:

// Returns a set containing {1!, 2!, ..., n!}.
set<int> GetFactorials(int n) {
  set<int> ret;
  int curr = 1;
  for (int i = 1; i < n; i++) {
    curr *= i;
    ret.insert(curr);
  }

  return ret;
}

set<int> fs = GetFactorials(5);

(This is just a dummy example. The key is that the function creates the set itself and returns it.)

One of my friends tells me that instead of writing the function the way I did, I should write it so that the function takes in a pointer to a set, in order to avoid copying the set on return. I'm guessing he meant something like:

void GetFactorials2(int n, set<int>* fs) {
  int curr = 1;
  for (int i = 1; i < n; i++) {
    curr *= i;
    fs->insert(curr);
  }
}

set<int> fs;
GetFactorials2(5, &fs);

My question: is this second way really a big advantage? It seems pretty weird to me. I'm new to C++, and don't know much about compilers, but I would assume that through some compiler magic, my original function wouldn't be that much more expensive. (And I'd get to avoid having to initialize the set myself.) Am I wrong? What should I know about pointers and copying-on-return to understand this?

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3  
Google for RVO and NRVO. –  Roger Rowland Apr 15 '13 at 4:35
    
For the record, unless the Collection or List class has a deep copy implemented, the difference between pointer or reference and value passing will be much less significant and it will be fixed in magnitude. –  Mr Universe Apr 15 '13 at 4:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No, it is generally not advantageous at all. Just about any reasonable compiler these days will utilize named return value optimization (see here). This effectively removes any performance penalty from the former example.

If you really want to get into the nitty gritty, read this article by Dave Abrahams (one of the big contributors to boost). Long story short, however, just return the value. It's probably faster.

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Yes it can be expensive. Especially when the set gets bigger. There is no reason not to use pointers or reference here. It will save you a lot and you don't sacrifice much regarding readability.

And why rely on compiler optimizations when you can optimize it yourself. The compiler knows your code but not always understands your algorithm.

I would do this

void GetFactorials2(int n, set<int>& fs) {
//                                   ^^
  int curr = 1;
  for (int i = 1; i < n; i++) {
    curr *= i;
    fs->insert(curr);
  }
}

and the call will stay normal.

set<int> fs;
GetFactorials2(5, fs);
                  ^^ 
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1  
Uglier code, loss of referential transparency, extra code required at call site, for no benefit in 99% of situations. –  Yuushi Apr 15 '13 at 5:03
    
@Yuushi The extra call at call site? you mean the extra fs? You are willing to depend on compiler optimization not to write that? –  Named Apr 15 '13 at 5:05
    
You've introduced a potential bug if the set is not empty when calling the function :P. It's just a matter of taste I guess, but I feel it's less readable and (potentially) requires more checks and perhaps, in the end, might even be a few nanoseconds slower than if you just wrote code to do what you meant instead of trying to workaround problems that don't exist. –  Siege Apr 15 '13 at 5:06
    
@Yuushi and to be complete ROV is a relatively new optimization. It is not even available on all compilers. I would rather right a proper code than to just let it go and hope the compiler optimizes it. –  Named Apr 15 '13 at 5:07
    
A relatively new optimization which was implemented by Walter Bright in 1991. This falls squarely into the camp of premature optimization and is thus 97% likely to be evil, as the saying goes... –  Yuushi Apr 15 '13 at 7:03

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