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I have been working in Rails (I mean serious working) for last 1.5 years now. Coming from .Net background and database/OLAP development, there are many things I like about Rails but there are few things about it that just don't make sense to me. I just need some clarification for one such issue.

I have been working on an educational institute's admission process, which is just a small part of much bigger application. Now, for administrator, we needed to display list of all applied/enrolled students (which may range from 1000 to 10,000), and also give a way to export them as excel file. For now, we are just focusing on exporting in CSV format.

My questions are:

  1. Is Rails meant to display so many records at the same time?

  2. Is will_paginate only way to paginate records in Rails? From what I understand, it still fetches all the records from DB, and then selectively displays relevant records. Back in .Net/PHP/JSP, we used to create stored procedure and from there we selectively returns relevant records. Since, using stored procedure being a known issue in Rails, what other options do we have?

  3. Same issue with exporting this data. I benchmarked the process i.e. receiving request at the server, execution of the query and response return. The ActiveRecord creation was taking a helluva time. Why was that? There were only like 1000 records, and the page showed connection timeout at the user. I mean, if connection times-out while working on for 1000 records, then why use Rails or it means Rails are not meant for such applications. I have previously worked with TB's of data, and never had this issue.

  4. I never understood ORM techniques at the core. Say, we have a table users, and are associated with multiple other tables, but for displaying records, we need data from only tables users and its associated table admissions, then does it actually create objects for all its associated tables. I know, the data will be fetched only if we use the association, but does it create all the objects before-hand?

I hope, these questions are not independent and do qualify as per the guidelines of SF.

Thank you.

EDIT: Any help? I re-checked and benchmarked again, for 1000 records, where in we are joining 4-5 different tables (1000 users, 2-3 one-to-one association, and 2-3 one-to-many associations), it is creating more than 15000 objects. This is for eager loading. As for lazy loading, it will be 1000 user query plus some 20+ queries). What are other possible options for such problems and applications? I know, I am kinda bumping the question to come to top again!

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ny help? I re-checked and benchmarked again, for 1000 records, where in we are joining 4-5 different tables (1000 users, 2-3 one-to-one association, and 2-3 one-to-many associations), it is creating more than 10000 objects. This is for eager loading. As for lazy loading, it will be 1000 user query plus approx. 10 extra queries). What are other possible options for such problems and applications? I know, I am kinda bumping the question to come to top again! –  Harsh Gupta Apr 18 '13 at 14:00

1 Answer 1

Rails can handle databases with TBs of data.

Is will_paginate only way to paginate records in Rails?

There are many other gems like "kaminari".

it fetches all records from the db..

NO. It doesnt work that way. For example take the following query,Users.all.page(1).per(10)

User.all wont fire a db query, it will return a proxy object. And you call page(1) and per(10) on the proxy(ActiveRecord::Relation). When you try to access the data from the proxy object, it will execute a db query. Active record will accumulate all conditions and paramaters you pass and will execute a sql query when required.

Go to rails console and type u= User.all; "f"; ( the second statement: "f", is to prevent rails console from calling to_s on the proxy to display the result.)

It wont fire any query. Now try u[0], it will fire a query.

ActiveRecord creation was taking a helluva time

1000 records shouldn't take much time.

  • Check the number of sql queries fired from the db. Look for signs of n+1 problem and fix them by eager loading.
  • Check the serialization of the records to csv format for any cpu or memory intensive operation.
  • Use a profiler and track down the function that is consuming most of the time.
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We have been using User.find(:all, ..., :page => something, :per_page => something. I know this is different from ActiveRelations, but will it affect the application much? I will certainly try both now to check the difference. –  Harsh Gupta Apr 15 '13 at 6:22
    
As for number of records, I figured that using a SQL View is better than getting a record and then calling an association, which would definitely fire many more SQL queries. I already checked and removed N+1 issue (by creating a view). As I already mentioned, I tried benchmarking the request for exporting (I cannot recall the name of the gem, I will let you know after checking it on the system), the time it still takes at creating ActiveRecord objects returned. Another way I read was to get ActiveRecord::Result using execute command of ActiveRecord::Base and using this raw result. –  Harsh Gupta Apr 15 '13 at 6:30
    
you dont have to create a view to get rid of n+1 issues. Checkout railscasts.com/episodes/22-eager-loading. –  manoj Apr 15 '13 at 6:46
    
Yeah, I knew about that, but view here helped me a bit my pivoting set of columns and just use them directly instead of writing many if-else conditions (or switch cases). Plus, even in eager loading, will the model create objects for all the associations or only for the loaded data? I only mean objects (with or without data). –  Harsh Gupta Apr 15 '13 at 7:57
    
1 point I missed to add. Even with eager loading, for each user object, we needed to get associated data from 5-6 other tables, the data (or the number objects to be created was huge). For 1000 records, the benchmark showed like 20000+ objects created (some object might have more than 1 associated record as in one-to-many relationships). This might have been wrong on our part too, but during eager-loading, we made sure only needed columns are being fetched. –  Harsh Gupta Apr 15 '13 at 9:12

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