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I have the following problem in my university:

What is the minimum n that there is a permutation of the integer numbers from 0 to n - 1, on which the algorithm runs forever?

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
int main()
{
    std::vector<int> v;
    v.push_back(3);
    v.push_back(1);
    v.push_back(0);
    v.push_back(6);
    v.push_back(2);
    v.push_back(7);
    v.push_back(5);
    v.push_back(4);
    int j = 0;
    int i = 0;
    for(i = 0; i < v.size(); i++)
    {
        if(v[i] > i) 
        {
            j = i;
            while( j < v.size() && v[j] >= j )
            {
                j = j + 1;
            }
            int temp = v[i];
            v[i] = v[j];
            v[j] = temp;
            i = 0;
        }

    }
    return 0;
}

I've found the permulation {3, 1, 0, 6, 2, 7, 5,4} manually. I will be thankfull if somebody check my answer or find smaller permulation.

I've tried a lot of permulations, but not by brute force, but by the logical choosing, and I think that is the smallest sequence in which the algorithm loops.

share|improve this question
1  
On which what algorithm runs forever? This one? Is it correctly coded in Java? What's the specification? – EJP Apr 15 '13 at 6:17
    
Yes, this algorithm. But the values of vector are mine. I need to find vector of the smallest size which makes algorithm run forever. – Ann Orlova Apr 15 '13 at 6:28
    
Sorry, that I tagged it by "Java". Initially the algorithm was on pseudocode. – Ann Orlova Apr 15 '13 at 6:29
    
The program runs and exits successfully: ideone.com/Jj1WL0 – nhahtdh Apr 15 '13 at 6:41
    
Sorry again. I've edit my permulation. – Ann Orlova Apr 15 '13 at 6:48
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Minimum n is 6. Possible solutions:

0 3 4 5 2 1 leads to 0 2 4 5 3 1 leads back to 0 3 4 5 2 1

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I ve checked. It is infinite loop. Thank you! – Ann Orlova Apr 15 '13 at 8:18

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