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I know my C up to this point. I was looking at the source files of PHP I downloaded, and I saw this strange syntax:

PHPAPI int php_printf(const char *format, ...)
{
    // code...
}

What does the PHPAPI do before the return type int? I've tried searching all over and I can't understand what this means. Is it a second return type? It can't be because the function does return an int. Maybe it extends to some other struct declared in a header file?

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1  
Most probably it specifies the calling convention. – Asha Apr 15 '13 at 6:35
1  
PHPAPI is probably a #define in one of the include files. – John3136 Apr 15 '13 at 6:36
1  
If you can pre-process the file then you can understand what the PHPAPI means – Raghuram Apr 15 '13 at 6:38
    
cc (or gcc) with the -E will show you the source file after the pre-processor has chewed on it. This is a quick (if verbose) way to find out what the macro expands to. – msw Apr 15 '13 at 6:40
    
You can search the PHP-Source code on GitHub: github.com/… – MarcDefiant Apr 15 '13 at 6:41
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The hard way:

Go to the makefile and add in the line compiles the file: -E After that you will see the file after the preprocessing.

The easy way:

Search all the project for PHPAPI:

find it in php.h:

#ifdef PHP_WIN32
#include "win95nt.h"
#   ifdef PHP_EXPORTS
#   define PHPAPI __declspec(dllexport) 
#   else
#   define PHPAPI __declspec(dllimport) 
#   endif
#define PHP_DIR_SEPARATOR '\\'
#else
#define PHPAPI
#define THREAD_LS
#define PHP_DIR_SEPARATOR '/'
#endif

Now what you need to know is what is __declspec(dllexport) and what is __declspec(dllimport)

In the SO thread- What is __declspec and when do I need to use it?

see Alexander Gessler answer:

The canonical examples are __declspec(dllimport) and __declspec(dllexport), which instruct the linker to import and export (respectively) a symbol from or to a DLL.

// header
__declspec(dllimport) void foo();


// code - this calls foo() somewhere in a DLL
foo();

(__declspec(..) just wraps up Microsoft's specific stuff - to achieve compatibility, one would usually wrap it away with macros)

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