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I currently have an app displaying the build number in its title window. That's well and good except it means nothing to most of the users, who want to know if they have the latest build - they tend to refer to it as "last Thursday's" rather than build 1.0.8.4321.

The plan is to put the build date there instead - So "App built on 21/10/2009" for example.

I'm struggling to find a programmatic way to pull the build date out as a text string for use like this.

For the build number, I used:

Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().GetName().Version.ToString()

after defining how those came up.

I'd like something like that for the compile date (and time, for bonus points).

Pointers here much appreciated (excuse pun if appropriate), or neater solutions...

Mark

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I tried the supplied ways to get the build data of assemblies which works in simple scenarios but if two assemblies are merged together i get not the correct build time, it is one hour in the future.. any suggestions? –  user662160 Mar 16 '11 at 9:01

11 Answers 11

up vote 163 down vote accepted

Jeff Atwood had a few things to say about this issue in Determining Build Date the hard way.

The most reliable method turns out to be retrieving the linker timestamp from the PE header embedded in the executable file -- some C# code (by Joe Spivey) for that from the comments to Jeff's article:

private DateTime RetrieveLinkerTimestamp()
{
    string filePath = System.Reflection.Assembly.GetCallingAssembly().Location;
    const int c_PeHeaderOffset = 60;
    const int c_LinkerTimestampOffset = 8;
    byte[] b = new byte[2048];
    System.IO.Stream s = null;

    try
    {
        s = new System.IO.FileStream(filePath, System.IO.FileMode.Open, System.IO.FileAccess.Read);
        s.Read(b, 0, 2048);
    }
    finally
    {
        if (s != null)
        {
            s.Close();
        }
    }

    int i = System.BitConverter.ToInt32(b, c_PeHeaderOffset);
    int secondsSince1970 = System.BitConverter.ToInt32(b, i + c_LinkerTimestampOffset);
    DateTime dt = new DateTime(1970, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0);
    dt = dt.AddSeconds(secondsSince1970);
    dt = dt.AddHours(TimeZone.CurrentTimeZone.GetUtcOffset(dt).Hours);
    return dt;
}
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12  
+1 Wow that's ... impressive. –  JustLoren Oct 21 '09 at 14:03
    
very impressive, but I tried John's 3 line one below, and certainly for my system and versions, it appears to work fine. However as per the article there are some limitations in that method, so I'm voting for both of yours and accepting yours so that future readers can benefit from its soundness. Thanks! –  Mark Mayo Oct 21 '09 at 14:54
1  
I would never dig into the PE header in that way, just to get the assembly version information. I've never had an issue with the build number not being update to date, that problem is a thing of the past. Since you're looking at the executable as raw bytes you have no guarantees that the PE header won't change in the future or be a Windows PE header at all (does this work in mono? probably yes). And that's the only reason you should ever need. Besides the format there's an probable issue with endian on the XBOX360 that you'll run into when someone tries to port this code. –  John Leidegren Feb 20 '10 at 9:47
2  
I've changed my tone about this somewhat, I'd still be very careful when digging into the acutal PE header. But as far as I can tell, this PE stuff is a lot more reliable than using the versioning numbers, besides I wan't to assign the version numbers seperate from the build date. –  John Leidegren Sep 30 '10 at 20:17
4  
I like this and am using it, but that second to last line with the .AddHours() is rather hackish and (I think) won't take DST into account. If you want it in local time, you should use the cleaner dt.ToLocalTime(); instead. The middle part could also be greatly simplified with a using() block. –  JLRishe May 7 '13 at 4:06

The new way

I changed my mind about this, and currently use this trick to get the correct build date.

#region Gets the build date and time (by reading the COFF header)

// http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms680313

struct _IMAGE_FILE_HEADER
{
    public ushort Machine;
    public ushort NumberOfSections;
    public uint TimeDateStamp;
    public uint PointerToSymbolTable;
    public uint NumberOfSymbols;
    public ushort SizeOfOptionalHeader;
    public ushort Characteristics;
};

static DateTime GetBuildDateTime(Assembly assembly)
{
    if (File.Exists(assembly.Location))
    {
        var buffer = new byte[Math.Max(Marshal.SizeOf(typeof(_IMAGE_FILE_HEADER)), 4)];
        using (var fileStream = new FileStream(assembly.Location, FileMode.Open, FileAccess.Read))
        {
            fileStream.Position = 0x3C;
            fileStream.Read(buffer, 0, 4);
            fileStream.Position = BitConverter.ToUInt32(buffer, 0); // COFF header offset
            fileStream.Read(buffer, 0, 4); // "PE\0\0"
            fileStream.Read(buffer, 0, buffer.Length);
        }
        var pinnedBuffer = GCHandle.Alloc(buffer, GCHandleType.Pinned);
        try
        {
            var coffHeader = (_IMAGE_FILE_HEADER)Marshal.PtrToStructure(pinnedBuffer.AddrOfPinnedObject(), typeof(_IMAGE_FILE_HEADER));

            return TimeZone.CurrentTimeZone.ToLocalTime(new DateTime(1970, 1, 1) + new TimeSpan(coffHeader.TimeDateStamp * TimeSpan.TicksPerSecond));
        }
        finally
        {
            pinnedBuffer.Free();
        }
    }
    return new DateTime();
}

#endregion

The old way

Well, how do you generate build numbers? Visual Studio (or the C# compiler) actually provides automatic build and revision numbers if you change the AssemblyVersion attribute to e.g. 1.0.*

What will happen is that is that the build will be equal to the number of days since January 1, 2000 local time, and for revision to be equal to the number of seconds since midnight local time, divided by 2.

see Community Content, Automatic Build and Revision numbers

e.g. AssemblyInfo.cs

[assembly: AssemblyVersion("1.0.*")] // important: use wildcard for build and revision numbers!

SampleCode.cs

var version = Assembly.GetEntryAssembly().GetName().Version;
var buildDateTime = new DateTime(2000, 1, 1).Add(new TimeSpan(
TimeSpan.TicksPerDay * version.Build + // days since 1 January 2000
TimeSpan.TicksPerSecond * 2 * version.Revision))); // seconds since midnight, (multiply by 2 to get original)
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Perfect, was just the limited short answer I needed and it works great. However I feel that for completeness, mdb's answer above will prevent others from shooting themselves in the foot, so accepting his. Gave you a vote tho - thanks! –  Mark Mayo Oct 21 '09 at 14:56
    
The community content seem to be removed... How can we be sure that MS wont change the algorithm? :) Any official docs on this guys? –  jitbit Jun 29 '10 at 7:50
    
This method gives me a timestamp that is off by one hour. I guess it's because of daylight savings time or perhaps because my timezone i CET, i.e. +1. I have tried construction the new DateTime with DateTimeKind.Local and DateTimeKind.Utc, but that doesn't help. –  Jan Aagaard Sep 30 '10 at 11:34
    
Yeah, I've started to think less of this approach after all. Digging into the PE header is just easier, and you get an UTC timestamp that you can do the correct stuff with. I use the version number for things other than determining build date now a days. However, I wrote my code a bit differently, I wouldn't assume that the timestamp is found at a specific offset every time. –  John Leidegren Sep 30 '10 at 20:04
    
Perfect, worked like a charm –  edvaldig Aug 26 '11 at 8:00

Add below to pre-build event command line:

echo %date% %time% > "$(ProjectDir)\Resources\BuildDate.txt"

Add this file as resource, now you have 'BuildDate' string in your resources.

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Clever way to get a reliable build date. I executed a (python) script in the pre-build event so I could better control the formatting of the build date. –  bj0 Oct 21 '13 at 17:40
    
i think this is the best way to go however if assembly is not your own then we might have to use @mdb's solution. I'll definitely go with your clever solution. –  Mubashar Ahmad Jan 10 at 5:04
1  
+1 from me, simple and effective. I even managed to get the value from the file with a line of code like this: String buildDate = <MyClassLibraryName>.Properties.Resources.BuildDate –  davidfrancis Feb 14 at 10:18
    
This will be my preferred approach going forward. –  Jason D May 9 at 13:12
    
+1 To this BTW. So elegant and simple. However I used a different format for the date time (YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS.MS) to guarantee parsing in any culture. –  Jason D May 9 at 13:56

I am just C# newbie so maybe my answer sound silly - I display the build date from the date the executable file was last written to:

string w_file = "MyProgram.exe"; 
string w_directory = Directory.GetCurrentDirectory();

DateTime c3 =  File.GetLastWriteTime(System.IO.Path.Combine(w_directory, w_file));
RTB_info.AppendText("Program created at: " + c3.ToString());

I tried to use File.GetCreationTime method but got weird results: the date from the command was 2012-05-29, but the date from the Window Explorer showed 2012-05-23. After searching for this discrepancy I found that the file was probably created on 2012-05-23 (as shown by Windows Explorer), but copied to the current folder on 2012-05-29 (as shown by File.GetCreationTime command) - so to be on the safe side I am using File.GetLastWriteTime command.

Zalek

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2  
I'm not sure if this is bullet proof from copying the executable across drives / computers / networks. –  Stealth Rabbi Nov 1 '13 at 17:24
    
this is the first thing comes in mind but you know its not reliable there are many software used to move the files over the network which do not update the attributes after downloading, i would go with @Abdurrahim's answer. –  Mubashar Ahmad Jan 10 at 5:00

Add below to pre-build event command line:

echo %date% %time% > "$(ProjectDir)\Resources\BuildDate.txt"

Add this file as resource, now you have 'BuildDate' string in your resources.

After inserting the file into the Resource (as public text file), I accessed it via

string strCompTime = Properties.Resources.BuildDate;
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The option not discussed here is to insert your own data into AssemblyInfo.cs, the "AssemblyInformationalVersion" field seems appropriate - we have a couple of projects where we were doing something similar as a build step (however I'm not entirely happy with the way that works so don't really want to reproduce what we've got).

There's an article on the subject on codeproject: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/dotnet/Customizing%5Fcsproj%5Ffiles.aspx

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For anyone that needs to get the compile time in Windows 8 / Windows Phone 8:

    public static async Task<DateTimeOffset?> RetrieveLinkerTimestamp(Assembly assembly)
    {
        var pkg = Windows.ApplicationModel.Package.Current;
        if (null == pkg)
        {
            return null;
        }

        var assemblyFile = await pkg.InstalledLocation.GetFileAsync(assembly.ManifestModule.Name);
        if (null == assemblyFile)
        {
            return null;
        }

        using (var stream = await assemblyFile.OpenSequentialReadAsync())
        {
            using (var reader = new DataReader(stream))
            {
                const int PeHeaderOffset = 60;
                const int LinkerTimestampOffset = 8;

                //read first 2048 bytes from the assembly file.
                byte[] b = new byte[2048];
                await reader.LoadAsync((uint)b.Length);
                reader.ReadBytes(b);
                reader.DetachStream();

                //get the pe header offset
                int i = System.BitConverter.ToInt32(b, PeHeaderOffset);

                //read the linker timestamp from the PE header
                int secondsSince1970 = System.BitConverter.ToInt32(b, i + LinkerTimestampOffset);

                var dt = new DateTimeOffset(1970, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, DateTimeOffset.Now.Offset) + DateTimeOffset.Now.Offset;
                return dt.AddSeconds(secondsSince1970);
            }
        }
    }

For anyone that needs to get the compile time in Windows Phone 7:

    public static async Task<DateTimeOffset?> RetrieveLinkerTimestampAsync(Assembly assembly)
    {
        const int PeHeaderOffset = 60;
        const int LinkerTimestampOffset = 8;            
        byte[] b = new byte[2048];

        try
        {
            var rs = Application.GetResourceStream(new Uri(assembly.ManifestModule.Name, UriKind.Relative));
            using (var s = rs.Stream)
            {
                var asyncResult = s.BeginRead(b, 0, b.Length, null, null);
                int bytesRead = await Task.Factory.FromAsync<int>(asyncResult, s.EndRead);
            }
        }
        catch (System.IO.IOException)
        {
            return null;
        }

        int i = System.BitConverter.ToInt32(b, PeHeaderOffset);
        int secondsSince1970 = System.BitConverter.ToInt32(b, i + LinkerTimestampOffset);
        var dt = new DateTimeOffset(1970, 1, 1, 0, 0, 0, DateTimeOffset.Now.Offset) + DateTimeOffset.Now.Offset;
        dt = dt.AddSeconds(secondsSince1970);
        return dt;
    }

NOTE: In all cases you're running in a sandbox, so you'll only be able to get the compile time of assemblies that you deploy with your app. (i.e. this won't work on anything in the GAC).

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There's a good article here Reading the Portable Executable (PE) header in C# about reading in the whole PE Header and then getting the header information you want, including the linker date and time.

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You could launch an extra step in the build process that writes a date stamp to a file which can then be displayed.

On the projects properties tab look at the build events tab. There is an option to execute a pre or post build command.

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You could use a project post-build event to write a text file to your target directory with the current datetime. You could then read the value at run-time. It's a little hacky, but it should work.

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I'm not sure, but maybe the Build Incrementer helps.

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