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I have a class MyClass that owns an instance of some DataProvider class and has a getter for this.

For the sake of Dependency Injection I would prefer to have a getter and a setter. Additionally the DataProvider should be contained in a unique_pointer:

#include <memory>
#include <iostream>

class DataProvider
{
public:
    DataProvider() {}
    virtual ~DataProvider() {}
    /* stuff */

private:
    /* more stuff */

};

class MyClass
{
public:
MyClass() {}

    virtual inline const DataProvider &getDataProvider() const
    {
        return *data;
    }
    void setDataProvider(std::unique_ptr<DataProvider> newData)
    {
        data = std::move(newData);
    }

private:
    std::unique_ptr<DataProvider> data;
};

I've read this: How do I pass a unique_ptr argument to a constructor or a function?

But it does not cover the getter part. Is this (above) the right way to do this? What are alternatives to think of?

share|improve this question
    
full example would be better then code snippets –  BЈовић Apr 15 '13 at 8:51
    
Works fine here. What vtable? We don't have any virtual functions. –  Joseph Mansfield Apr 15 '13 at 8:59
    
@sftrabbit You're right, I had to add some more info about DataProvider and the way that it is broken in the end. –  TobiMcNamobi Apr 15 '13 at 9:14
    
Does the default constructor of DataProvider set xyz? –  Joseph Mansfield Apr 15 '13 at 9:16
2  
@user1916893 Okay, extract the lines you think are important and make a new small program using them. When you experience the same problem, post it here. For all we know, the problem is in the 1500 lines of legacy code. –  Joseph Mansfield Apr 15 '13 at 9:34

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As you wrote

virtual inline const DataProvider &getDataProvider() const
{
    return *data;
}
void setDataProvider(std::unique_ptr<DataProvider> newData)
{
    data = std::move(newData);
}

is perfectly OK. In the setter the class gets ownership of the DataProvider instance and never let go (as far as seen here).

A full example has been given by sftrabbit here: http://ideone.com/enarAS

share|improve this answer
    
Can you explain this whole thing virtual inline const DataProvider &getDataProvider() const (the use of virtual, inline and the two const) for a newbie? :) –  toogy Apr 5 '14 at 1:21
    
@toggy getDataProvider is the name of the method, that's an easy one I guess. const in general means "there is something constant here, a variable which has a value that cannot be changed" (it can be bypassed but in this comment I assume that const means "not changeable"). The second const just means that in this method no class member will be changed. The this pointer itself is const. The first const is part of the return type const DataProvider& - a reference to a DataProvider object and this object cannot be changed. –  TobiMcNamobi Apr 7 '14 at 7:28
    
@toggy A method declared as virtual is best explained with an example: Say you have a base class A and a class B deriving from A. A has a public method f(). So you can call f() on objects of type A and on objects of type B. Now B has a method f(), too. Consider a pointer c to an object of type A: A* c;. If c actually points to an object of type B and you write 'c->f();', the f() of A will be called unless f() is virtual in which case the f() of B will be called. That's the difference. –  TobiMcNamobi Apr 7 '14 at 7:36
    
@toggy 'inline' means that while building your project the optimizer shall *prefer*(!) to substitue the method body at each place where the method is called. In fact I normally don't use this keyword and let the compiler decide for itself. Anyway I found a good explanation here: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/language/inline –  TobiMcNamobi Apr 7 '14 at 7:40
    
I didn't mean 'that' newbie x) I just wanted to know why they were 2 const keywords and why it was useful to use virtual and inline here. Thanks :p –  toogy Apr 7 '14 at 11:18

While I am not sure if this really is what you need this is a starting point:

const DataProvider &getDataProvider() const
{
    return *data.get();
}
share|improve this answer
    
As far as I understand unique_ptr IMHO this makes no difference. –  TobiMcNamobi Apr 15 '13 at 11:28

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