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In the context of block devices like a file; are Linux kernel AIO functions like io_submit() only asynchronous within the supplied queue of I/O operations, or are they (also) asynchronous across several prosesses and/or threads that also have queues of I/O operations on the same file.

Doc says: The io_submit() system call queues nr I/O request blocks for processing in the AIO context ctx_id. The iocbpp argument should be an array of nr AIO control blocks, which will be submitted to context ctx_id.

Update:

Example: If I spawn two threads, both have 100 queued I/O operations on the same file and both call io_submit() at approx. the same time; will all 200 I/O operations be asynchronous or will thread #1's 100 I/O operations only be asynchronous in regards to each other but block thread #2 until all thread #1's I/O operations are done?

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I don't understand: for me asynchronous means "not synchronous with regards to a given instruction flow". If an instruction is synchronous, it is within that very instruction flow which it belongs to, and asynchronous to any other. –  didierc Apr 15 '13 at 9:33
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@didierc Example: If I spawn two threads, both have 100 queued I/O operations on the same file and both call io_submit() at approx. the same time; will all 200 I/O operations be asynchronous or will thread #1's 100 I/O operations only be asynchronous in regards to each other but block thread #2 until all thread #1's I/O operations are done? –  Inge Henriksen Apr 15 '13 at 9:44

2 Answers 2

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When a set of io requests is submitted with io_submit, the system call returns immediately. From the point of view of the thread emitting the requests, the execution of the commands embedded in the requests is asynchronous. The thread will have to query the OS to know the result, and is free to do what it wants in the mean time.

Now, if two threads happens to emit each a set of requests, they will both fall in the same situation. They will both have to ask the OS about the advancement of their respective IO commands. None of the threads will be blocked.

From the AIO framework point of view, it is entirely possible to make the OS actually execute the requests before returning from the io_submit call for either or all the threads invoking it, but the API remains the same: userland threads will still manipulate the API as an async one, obtaining a token for a future result from the API when it posts its requests, and using that token to get the real result.

In the specific case of linux AIO, the token is the context created beforehand, and the result check syscall is io_getevents, which reports an "event" (ie. a result) for each completed request.

Regarding your example, is it possible that during the second syscall, all the requests of the first thread get completed? I don't see a reason for this never happening at all, but if both threads post 100 requests very close to each other, then it seems very unlikely. A more likely scenario is that several requests of the first thread to call io_submit got completed when the second thread makes its own call to io_submit, but at any rate that call will not block.

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not sure if I am really answering your question. let me know if there's something I missed here. –  didierc Apr 15 '13 at 10:41

The only PART of asynchronous behaviour that your application should care about is within your application. Yes, other processes are likely going to ALSO write data to the disk at some point during the runtime of your application. There is very little you can do to stop that in a multitasking, multiuser and potentially multiprocessor system.

The general idea here is that your application doesn't block, which is the way that read or write [and their more advanced cousins, fread, fwrite, etc).

If you want to stop other processes from touching "your" files, then you need to use file-locking or something similar.

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