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I have a list containing a list of words called words. I have a function called random_sentence which can be called using any sentence. I want to search the random sentence for any word in my list that is in the spot [0] of each list and then switch it with the corresponding word in that list. Hope that makes sense.

words = [["I", "you"], ["i", "you"], ["we", "you"], ["my", "your"], ["our", "your"]]

def random_sentence(sentence):
   list = sentence.split()
   string = sentence
   for y in list:
      for i in words:
         for u in i:
            if y == u:
              mylist = i[1]
              string = string.replace(y, mylist)
   return string

So random_sentence("I have a my pet dog") should return "you have your pet dog". My function works some times, but other times it does not. Say random_sentence("I went and we") produces "you yount and you" does not make sense.

How do I fix my function to produce the right outcome?

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1  
As a side note: you shouldn't name a variable list, as that's the name of the list type, and the function you call to convert things into lists. Also avoid string, because that's the name of a standard library module. Also, it's very hard to keep straight a bunch of one-letter variable names like y, i, and u. –  abarnert Apr 15 '13 at 10:50
    
I would like to thank everyone that responded to this. You have helped me heaps :D –  user2281942 Apr 15 '13 at 12:56
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4 Answers

First, your code, as pasted, does not even run. You have a space instead of an underscore in your function definition, and you never return anything.

But, after fixing that, your code does exactly what you describe.

To figure out why, try adding prints to see what it's doing at each step, or running it through a visualizer, like this one.

When you get to the point where y is "we", you'll end up doing this:

string = string.replace("we", "you")

But that will replace every we in string, including the one in went.

If you want to do things this way, you probably want to modify each y in list, and then join them back together at the end, like this:

def random_sentence(sentence):
    list = sentence.split()
    for index, y in enumerate(list):
        for i in words:
            for u in i:
                if y == u:
                    mylist = i[1]
                    list[index] = mylist
    return ' '.join(list)

If you find this hard to understand… well, so do I. All of your variable names are either a single letter, or a misleading name (like mylist, which isn't even a list). Also, you're looking over i when you really only want to check the first element. See if this is more readable:

replacements = [["I", "you"], ["i", "you"], ["we", "you"], ["my", "your"], ["our", "your"]]
def random_sentence(sentence):
    words = sentence.split()
    for index, word in enumerate(words):
        for replacement in replacements:
            if word == replacement[0]:
                words[index] = replacement[1]
    return ' '.join(words)

However, there's a much better way to solve this problem.

First, instead of having a list of word-replacement pairs, just use a dictionary. Then you can get rid of a whole loop and make it much easier to read (and faster, too):

replacements = {"I": "you", "i": "you", "we": "you", "my": "your", "our": "your"}
def random_sentence(sentence):
    words = sentence.split()
    for index, word in enumerate(words):
        replacement = replacements.get(word, word)
        words[index] = replacement
    return ' '.join(words)

And then, instead of trying to modify the original list in place, just build up a new one:

def random_sentence(sentence):
    result = []
    for word in sentence.split():
        result.append(replacements.get(word, word))
    return ' '.join(result)

Then, this result = [], for …: result.append(…) is exactly what a list comprehension is for:

def random_sentence(sentence):
    result = [replacements.get(word, word) for word in sentence.split()]
    return ' '.join(result)

… or, since you don't actually need the list for any purpose but to serve it to join, you can use a generator expression instead:

def random_sentence(sentence):
    return ' '.join(replacements.get(word, word) for word in sentence.split())
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I am WOWED. Great amount of info here. Do not understand it all yet, but now I have your solution I can go about researching what it all means. REALLY appreciate the help Abarnert –  user2281942 Apr 15 '13 at 14:07
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A Dictionary/map makes more sense here, not an array of arrays. Define your dictionary words as:

words = {"I":"you", "i":"you", "we":"you","my":"your","our":"your"}

And then, use it as:

def randomsentence(text):
    result = []
    for word in text.split():
        if word in words:  #Check if the current word exists in our dictionary
            result.append(words[word])   #Append the value against the word
        else:
            result.append(word)          

    return " ".join(result)

OUTPUT:

>>> randomsentence("I have a my pet dog")
'you have a your pet dog'
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>>> words = {'I': 'you', 'i': 'you', 'we': 'you', 'my': 'your', 'our': 'your'}
>>> def random_sentence(sentence):
        return ' '.join([words.get(word, word) for word in sentence.split()])
>>> random_sentence('I have a my pet dog')
'you have a your pet dog'
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You realize you've tested it on the example that already worked in the OP's original version? –  abarnert Apr 15 '13 at 11:04
    
lol that is a little funny. Appreciate the time an effort you spent responding to my plea for help though. –  user2281942 Apr 15 '13 at 14:05
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The problem is that string.replace replaces substrings that are parts of the words. You can manually build an answer like this:

def random_sentence(sentence):
    list = sentence.split()
    result = []
    for y in list:
        for i in words:
            if i[0] == y:
                result.append(i[1])
                break
        else:
            result.append(y)


    return " ".join(result)

Note that else corresponds to for not if.

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