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I have to find the gaussian parameters of a data series with at least two peaks. How can I manage? Assume I have yi = f(xi) and I need the parameters mu and sigma.

I know I can take the logarithm of all data and then working them out with polyfit, but in this way in few words I get something I don't need (too long to say why).

What should I do?

Important detail: My MATLAB version DOESN'T have normfit.

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1  
So is your data a union or a sum of two normally distributed sets? –  Eitan T Apr 15 '13 at 10:20
2  
By two peaks, I guess you mean you want to find the mixture models? This code might help: cs.ru.nl/~ali/index_files/EM.m –  zkan Apr 15 '13 at 10:21
1  
@ragnar So it's a union then. –  Eitan T Apr 15 '13 at 11:14
1  
Expectation maximization is what is commonly done as @zkan suggests. –  Memming Apr 15 '13 at 14:19
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@ragnar - is there a reason why you do not "accept" any answer for your questions? –  Shai May 22 '13 at 14:14

2 Answers 2

I've answered this type of question a few times here, and each time I think "it just must be possible to do this sort of thing much simpler..." However, I haven't yet seen or thought of a simpler method, so...bear with me :)

If you know the number of peaks beforehand, you can just do this:

function GaussFit

    % DATA TO REPRODUCE
    mu    = [112  -45];
    sigma = [ 12   24];

    F =[...
        mu(1) + sigma(1)*randn(1e4, 1)
        mu(2) + sigma(2)*randn(1e4, 1)];

    % interpolate with splines through the histogram
    [y,x] = hist(F, 1500);
    G = spline(x,y);

    % Find optimum curve fit 
    P0 = [% mu  S    A
            80  2   2e3;  % (some rough initial estimate)
            -8  12  2e3];        
    P = fminunc(@(P) Obj(P, x,G), P0); % refine the estimate

    % REPRODUCED DATA
    P(:,1:2).'

    figure, clf, hold on
    plot(x, P(1,3)*Gaussian(P(1,1),P(1,2),x) + P(2,3)*Gaussian(P(2,1),P(2,2),x))
    plot(x, ppval(G,x),'r.', 'MarkerSize', 1)

end

% The objective function for the curve fitting optimizer
function val = Obj(P, x,F)

    G = zeros(size(x));    
    for ii = 1:size(P,1);

        mu = P(ii,1);    % mean
        sigma = P(ii,2); % std. deviation
        A = P(ii,3);     % "amplitude"

        G = G + A/sigma/sqrt(2*pi) * exp(-(x-mu).^2/2/sigma^2);

    end    

    val = sum((G-ppval(F,x)).^2);

end

% just a function for plotting
function G = Gaussian(mu,sigma,x)
    G = 1/sigma/sqrt(2*pi) * exp(-(x-mu).^2/2/sigma^2);    
end

Results:

ans =
  112.1633   -45.2013
  12.6777     24.6723

Gaussian fit

Pretty good results I'd say :)

As always, there's a few drawbacks to this method; it requires you to know beforehand

  1. the number of peaks in the data set
  2. an initial estimate that's "close enough" for the optimizer to converge to the real solution

If you don't know the number of peaks beforehand (and want to find the number of peaks automatically), you'll have to use kmeans and some heuristics to locate the amount of peaks (and their means) in your dataset(s).

In any case, the important thing is that there are ways to find the number of peaks, but there are no ways to find suitable initial estimates automatically. If you only have one or a few dozen data sets, finding initial estimates can still be done manually, but anything beyond that will make the method above less and less attractive.

You could however use a global optimizer, in which case you don't have to come up with initial estimates anymore. But it is at this point that I can't help thinking

"That should not be necessary for such a simple problem!"

But oh well.

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Provided that your MATLAB supports kmeans, you can try clustering your data into two clusters, and then calculate the mean and the variance of each cluster independently:

%// Cluster bimodal data
idx = kmeans(y, 2);
y1 = y(idx == 1);
y2 = y(idx == 2);

%// Compute means and variances of clusters
M = [mean(y1), mean(y2)];
V = [var(y1), var(y2)];

For the general case of k modes, you can use the following code:

idx = kmeans(y, k);    %// Cluster data
C = arrayfun(@(x)y(idx == x), 1:k, 'UniformOutput', false);
M = cellfun(@mean, C); %// Mean of clusters
V = cellfun(@var, C);  %// Variance of clusters

The benefit of this approach is that it works for any number of clusters as long as it is known a priori.

Example

Let's generate some arbitrary bimodal Gaussian data first:

N = 1e4;                    %// Number of samples per mode
M = [1, 5]; V = [0.2, 0.4]; %// Means and variances of two normal distributions
y = bsxfun(@plus, bsxfun(@times, randn(1e4, 1), sqrt(V), M);
y = y(randperm(numel(y)));  %// Shuffle samples

We should get something with the following histogram:

enter image description here

Now let's perform k-means clustering and compute the mean and variance of each cluster:

idx = kmeans(y, 2);    %// Cluster bimodal data
C = arrayfun(@(x)y(idx == x), 1:k, 'UniformOutput', false);
M = cellfun(@mean, C); %// Mean of clusters
V = cellfun(@var, C);  %// Variance of clusters

The results I got were:

M =
    0.9985    4.9802

V =
    0.1949    0.3854

which is pretty close to the original data.


If you don't have MATLAB's kmeans, you can use a FEX implementation, for example litekmeans.

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Sorry for the delay, I was away for a while. Unfortunately my MATLAB does not support kmeans. However I'll bear it in mind for future uses –  ragnar Apr 15 '13 at 12:21
    
@ragnar Hmm, I guess you don't have the Statistics Toolbox installed? Maybe you can download an alternate FEX implementation of kmeans? I'll see if I can come up with a solution that doesn't employ the Statistics Toolbox... –  Eitan T Apr 15 '13 at 13:31
    
you are likely right, as I can't even use the fit function properly: I tried doing something like fit(x, data, 'fourier8') and it didn't work at all.. do you know how to download/install the Statistics Toolbox from the internet without using e-mule, torrent or similar stuff? –  ragnar Apr 16 '13 at 9:09
    
you are likely right, as I can't even use the fit function properly: I tried doing something like fit(x, data, 'fourier8') and it didn't work at all.. do you know how to download/install the Statistics Toolbox from the internet without using e-mule, torrent or similar stuff? –  ragnar Apr 16 '13 at 9:10
    
@ragnar Use a FEX implementation then (such as litekmeans), it should work without the Statistics Toolbox and give you the same results. –  Eitan T Apr 17 '13 at 6:44

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