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I'll make it short.

I have 2 classes: Apple and Orange, as the following:

Apple.h (Apple.c is blank)

#ifndef APPLE_H_
#define APPLE_H_

class Apple {};

#endif /* APPLE_H_ */

Orange.h:

#ifndef ORANGE_H_
#define ORANGE_H_

#include "Apple.h"

class Orange {
public:
    Orange();
    virtual ~Orange();
    operator Apple ();
};

#endif /* ORANGE_H_ */

Orange.cpp:

#include "Orange.h"

Orange::Orange() {
    // TODO Auto-generated constructor stub

}

Orange::~Orange() {
    // TODO Auto-generated destructor stub
}

Orange::operator Apple() {
    Apple y;
    return y;
}

As these, these are works great.

but when I add #include "Orange.h" to Apple.h , I get 'operator Apple' is not a recognized operator or type error.

as the following:

#ifndef APPLE_H_
#define APPLE_H_

#include "Orange.h"

class Apple {};

#endif /* APPLE_H_ */

What is the problem that #include "Orange.h" makes?

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marked as duplicate by Andy Prowl, Nicholas Wilson, Peter Ritchie, unkulunkulu, ShadowScripter Apr 15 '13 at 14:31

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
A circular include is the problem. –  Luchian Grigore Apr 15 '13 at 10:20
    
Actually that code should work, Orange.cpp includes Orange.h which includes Apple.h which does not include Orange.h since ORANGE_H_ is already defined, or am I mistaken? –  filmor Apr 15 '13 at 10:23
    
You need to forward declare Apple in Orange.h: class Apple; –  Roger Lipscombe Apr 15 '13 at 10:23
1  
@filmor There's no preprocessor bug. It's simply wrong. If Apple.h includes Orange.h, Orange.h will try including Apple.h again (but it will do nothing due to the APPLE_H_ guard), and you end up with the Orange class definition that references the Apple type before Apple is declared. –  jamesdlin Apr 15 '13 at 11:10
1  
@filmor Ah, I see what you mean. Yeah, maybe there's something that the OP isn't telling us then. (Regardless, the circular #include is still a bad idea.) –  jamesdlin Apr 15 '13 at 11:17

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It's because you now have a circular dependency: Orange.h depends on Apple.h which depends on Orange.h etc.

In the Orange.h header file it might be enough to declare the Apple class:

// Tell the compiler that there is a class named `Apple`
class Apple;

class Orange {
public:
    Orange();
    virtual ~Orange();
    operator Apple ();
};

Then in the Orange.cpp source file you include the Apple.h header file.

share|improve this answer
    
Not exactly, but I found a workaround using your tip. thanks. I'll wait for more answers - it there won't, I'll flag yours as best. thanks. –  Billie Apr 15 '13 at 10:35

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