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I'm trying to parse a date String which can have tree different formats. Even though the String should not match the second pattern it somehow does and therefore returns a wrong date.

That's my code:

import java.text.ParseException;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.Date;

public class Start {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("dd.MM.yyyy");
        try{
            System.out.println(sdf.format(parseDate("2013-01-31")));
        } catch(ParseException ex){
            System.out.println("Unable to parse");
        }
    }

    public static Date parseDate(String dateString) throws ParseException{
        SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("dd.MM.yyyy");
        SimpleDateFormat sdf2 = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MM-yyyy");
        SimpleDateFormat sdf3 = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd");

        Date parsedDate;
        try {
            parsedDate = sdf.parse(dateString);
        } catch (ParseException ex) {
            try{
                parsedDate = sdf2.parse(dateString);
            } catch (ParseException ex2){
                parsedDate = sdf3.parse(dateString);    
            }
        }
        return parsedDate;
    }
}

With the input 2013-01-31 I get the output 05.07.0036.

If I try to parse 31-01-2013 or 31.01.2013 I get 31.01.2013 as expected.

I recognized that the programm will give me exactly the same output if I set the patterns like this:

SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("d.M.y");
SimpleDateFormat sdf2 = new SimpleDateFormat("d-M-y");
SimpleDateFormat sdf3 = new SimpleDateFormat("y-M-d");

Why does it ignore the number of chars in my pattern?

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4 Answers 4

It is documented in the SimpleDateFormat javadoc:

For formatting, the number of pattern letters is the minimum number of digits, and shorter numbers are zero-padded to this amount. For parsing, the number of pattern letters is ignored unless it's needed to separate two adjacent fields.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Teetoo. I do not see this in the oracle.com class docs. It is a well hidden trap that we did not discover during testing. Truly a bad design. Another bad feature is that they are "lenient" by default so you need to setLenient(false). Otherwise they will interpret all kinds of garbage as valid date/time information. –  Steve Zobell Oct 21 '13 at 14:01

A workaround could be to test the yyyy-MM-dd format with a regex:

public static Date parseDate(String dateString) throws ParseException {
    SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("dd.MM.yyyy");
    SimpleDateFormat sdf2 = new SimpleDateFormat("dd-MM-yyyy");
    SimpleDateFormat sdf3 = new SimpleDateFormat("yyyy-MM-dd");

    Date parsedDate;
    try {
        if (dateString.matches("\\d{4}-\\d{2}-\\d{2}")) {
            parsedDate = sdf3.parse(dateString);
        } else {
            throw new ParseException("", 0);
        }
    } catch (ParseException ex) {
        try {
            parsedDate = sdf2.parse(dateString);
        } catch (ParseException ex2) {
            parsedDate = sdf.parse(dateString);
        }
    }
    return parsedDate;
}
share|improve this answer

There are several serious issues with SimpleDateFormat. The default lenient setting can produce garbage answers, and I cannot think of a case where lenient has any benefit. This should never have been the default setting. But disabling lenient is only part of the solution. You can still end up with garbage results that are hard to catch in testing. See the comments in the code below for examples.

Here is an extension of SimpleDateFormat that forces strict pattern match. This should have been the default behavior for that class.

import java.text.DateFormatSymbols;
import java.text.ParseException;
import java.text.ParsePosition;
import java.text.SimpleDateFormat;
import java.util.Date;
import java.util.Locale;

/**
 * Extension of SimpleDateFormat that implements strict matching.
 * parse(text) will only return a Date if text exactly matches the
 * pattern. 
 * 
 * This is needed because SimpleDateFormat does not enforce strict 
 * matching. First there is the lenient setting, which is true
 * by default. This allows text that does not match the pattern and
 * garbage to be interpreted as valid date/time information. For example,
 * parsing "2010-09-01" using the format "yyyyMMdd" yields the date 
 * 2009/12/09! Is this bizarre interpretation the ninth day of the  
 * zeroth month of 2010? If you are dealing with inputs that are not 
 * strictly formatted, you WILL get bad results. You can override lenient  
 * with setLenient(false), but this strangeness should not be the default. 
 *
 * Second, setLenient(false) still does not strictly interpret the pattern. 
 * For example "2010/01/5" will match "yyyy/MM/dd". And data disagreement like 
 * "1999/2011" for the pattern "yyyy/yyyy" is tolerated (yielding 2011). 
 *
 * Third, setLenient(false) still allows garbage after the pattern match. 
 * For example: "20100901" and "20100901andGarbage" will both match "yyyyMMdd". 
 * 
 * This class restricts this undesirable behavior, and makes parse() and 
 * format() functional inverses, which is what you would expect. Thus
 * text.equals(format(parse(text))) when parse returns a non-null result.
 * 
 * @author zobell
 *
 */
public class StrictSimpleDateFormat extends SimpleDateFormat {

    protected boolean strict = true;

    public StrictSimpleDateFormat() {
        super();
        setStrict(true);
    }

    public StrictSimpleDateFormat(String pattern) {
        super(pattern);
        setStrict(true);
    }

    public StrictSimpleDateFormat(String pattern, DateFormatSymbols formatSymbols) {
        super(pattern, formatSymbols);
        setStrict(true);
    }

    public StrictSimpleDateFormat(String pattern, Locale locale) {
        super(pattern, locale);
        setStrict(true);
    }

    /**
     * Set the strict setting. If strict == true (the default)
     * then parsing requires an exact match to the pattern. Setting
     * strict = false will tolerate text after the pattern match. 
     * @param strict
     */
    public void setStrict(boolean strict) {
        this.strict = strict;
        // strict with lenient does not make sense. Really lenient does
        // not make sense in any case.
        if (strict)
            setLenient(false); 
    }

    public boolean getStrict() {
        return strict;
    }

    /**
     * Parse text to a Date. Exact match of the pattern is required.
     * Parse and format are now inverse functions, so this is
     * required to be true for valid text date information:
     * text.equals(format(parse(text))
     * @param text
     * @param pos
     * @return
     */
    @Override
    public Date parse(String text, ParsePosition pos) {
        int posIndex = pos.getIndex();
        Date d = super.parse(text, pos);
        if (strict && d != null) {
           String format = this.format(d);
           if (posIndex + format.length() != text.length() ||
                 !text.endsWith(format)) {
              d = null; // Not exact match
           }
        }
        return d;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Nice implementation. But I wouldn't counter setLenient with setStrict because that creates redundancy. Better to just stick with the setLenient super method and have the constructors call setLenient(false), and the parse method should call !isLenient() instead of using strict. With redundancy, there is a chance of inconsistency. Imagine: setStrict(true); setLenient(true); Now is it strict or lenient? –  ADTC Jul 10 at 10:12
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Thanks @Teetoo. That helped me to find the solution to my problem:

If I want the parse function to match the pattern exactly I have to set "lenient" (SimpleDateFormat.setLenient) of my SimpleDateFormat to false:

SimpleDateFormat sdf = new SimpleDateFormat("d.M.y");
sdf.setLenient(false);
SimpleDateFormat sdf2 = new SimpleDateFormat("d-M-y");
sdf2.setLenient(false);
SimpleDateFormat sdf3 = new SimpleDateFormat("y-M-d");
sdf3.setLenient(false);

This will still parse the date if I only use one pattern letter for each segment but it will recognize that 2013 can't be the day and therefore it does not match the second pattern. In combination with a length check I recive exactly what I want.

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