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I continuously find myself having to write timed windows services that poll outside queues or run timed processes. I consequently have a fairly robust template by which to do this, but I find that every time I write a service to do this, I start with the same template and then write the process inside it.

This morning I find myself wondering if I could actually turn this template into a framework that I could inject my process into. My basic template is only 122 lines of code. Due to differing requirements for each process - i.e. different number of arguments, different argument types and different dependencies (some are dependent on Web Services, some on databases etc.) I can't figure out how to set up my basic template to receive an injected process.

The heart of the template is just a timer that stops when it initializes and starts the process and then restarts the timer once the process completes. I then add my process method and any dependencies right into the template.

Has anyone got any ideas how to do this? I've looked at dependency injection and often use it already for injection of things like data store connectivity? Is there a way to inject a delegate with an unknown number/type of parameters into a class? Am I looking at this incorrectly?

This is the template I have:

TimedProcess.Template.cs

using System;
using System.Timers;

public partial class TimedProcess : IDisposable
{
    private Timer timer;

    public bool InProcess { get; protected set; }

    public bool Running
    {
        get
        {
            if (timer == null)
                return false;

            return timer.Enabled;
        }
    }

    private void InitTimer(int interval)
    {
        if (timer == null)
        {
            timer = new Timer();
            timer.Elapsed += TimerElapsed;
        }
        Interval = interval;
    }

    public void InitExecuteProcess()
    {
        timer.Stop();
        InProcess = true;
        RunProcess();
        InProcess = false;
        timer.Start();   
    }

    public void TimerElapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        InitExecuteProcess();
    }

    public void Start()
    {
        if (timer != null && timer.Interval > 0)
            timer.Start();
    }

    public void Start(int interval)
    {
        InitTimer(interval);
        Start();
    }

    public void Stop()
    {
        timer.Stop();
    }

    public TimedProcess()
        : this(0)
    {
    }

    public TimedProcess(int interval)
    {
        if (interval > 0)
            InitTimer(interval);
    }

    private disposed = false;
    public Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (disposed || !disposing)
            return;

        timer.Dispose();

        disposed = true;
    }

    public Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
    }

    ~TimedProcess()
    {
        Dispose(false);
    }
}

TimedProcess.cs

using System;

public partial class TimedProcess
{
    public void RunProcess()
    {
        //Hook process to run in here
    }
}

So I'm looking to modify it so that my Windows Service spawns a new TimedProcess and injects it with the process that needs running thereby removing the TimedProcess code from my Windows Service entirely and having it reference the DLL.

Edit: Thanks for everyone's help. I realized that if I push my RunProcess() method outside of my TimedProcess library and pass that in as an Action in the constructor, then this simplifies everything the way I was looking to:

[Simplified for brevity]

public class TimedProcess
{
    Action RunProcess;
    Timer timer = new Timer();

    private void TimerElapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
    {
        if (RunProcess != null)
            RunProcess();
    }

    public TimedProcess(Action action, int interval)
    {
        timer.Interval = interval;
        RunProcess = action;
        timer.Start();
    }
}
share|improve this question
3  
Suppose there were a way to do that. What would your code to invoke the delegate look like? – Eric Lippert Oct 21 '09 at 15:16
    
@Eric Lippert - That's what I'm struggling with right now; Maybe the template is the right way, but it smells like cut and paste code that is being reused time and again that I could package up nicely into a little library. The question is, is a 122 line template of copied code more efficient than the alternative? I have no answer for that question yet. – BobTheBuilder Oct 21 '09 at 15:21
up vote 3 down vote accepted

One approach here would be to use captured variables so that all delegates essentially become Action or maybe Func<T> - and leave the rest to the caller via the magic of anonymous methods, captured variables, etc - i.e.

DoStuff( () => DoSomethingInteresting("abc", 123) );

(caveat: watch out for async / capture - often a bad combination)

where DoStuff accepts an Action. Then when you invoke the Action the parameters are automatically added etc. In some RPC library code I've taken this approach the other way, using Expression - so I express a service interface (as normal), and then have methods like:

Invoke(Expression<Action<TService>> action) {...}
Invoke<TValue>(Expression<Func<TService,TValue>> func) {...}

called, for example:

proxy.Invoke(svc => svc.CancelOrder(orderNumber));

Then the caller says what to if we had an implementation of that interface - except we never actually do; instead, we pull the Expression apart and look at the method being called, the args, etc - and pass these to the RPC layer. If you are interested, it is discussed more here, or the code is available here.

share|improve this answer
    
Question: If I inject my process in this fashion, does it still have the context of its original class? i.e. Class Properties/Fields or does it run in the context of my TimedProcess class? – BobTheBuilder Oct 21 '09 at 15:53
    
Any instances (including "this") will be "captured", if that is what you mean. – Marc Gravell Oct 21 '09 at 15:55
    
so if my process references properties from its own class (instance) using this.Propertyn, this.Fieldn rather than just by using Propertyn or Fieldn then it would work? I'm just making sure I understand your meaning. – BobTheBuilder Oct 21 '09 at 16:13
    
It'll work identically with or without the "this", the same as regular code. But: yes. – Marc Gravell Oct 21 '09 at 17:38
    
Perfect, thanks – BobTheBuilder Oct 21 '09 at 17:43

One means of having a delegate that takes an unknown set of parameters is to pass an array of objects. You can then use the array's length as the number of parameters, and since any type is convertable into an object, you can pass anything.

share|improve this answer

You can use a delegate without parameters to represent the "service call":

ThreadStart taskToPerform = delegate() { // do your stuff here
   YourService.Call(X, Y, Z);
};
Template.AddProcess(taskToPerform);
share|improve this answer
    
That's actually quite inspired. Instead of passing the process in, passing the thread itself. I may explore this idea further. – BobTheBuilder Oct 21 '09 at 15:48
    
Note that I'm just using the ThreadStart delegate, which happens to be a delegate without arguments. I'm not passing a thread into it, sorry for the confusion. – Lucero Oct 21 '09 at 15:56
    
Sorry, it was my inaccurate use of language that was at fault. I understood your meaning. Threadstart allows me to "preconfigure" the thread and hook it up to the ThreadStart delegate. I then pass the ThreadStart delegate into my TimedProcess class. – BobTheBuilder Oct 21 '09 at 16:19
    
Basically (as others have also suggested in the meantime) I'm putting the code to process in your TimedProcess together as unparametrized delegate, so that this can be called at any time without needing further argument passing. – Lucero Oct 21 '09 at 16:23

For completeness, here's some example implementations.

Both use the wrapped delegate methodology already discussed. One uses "params" and one uses generics. Both avoid the "async / capture" problem. In fact, this is very similar to how events are implemented.

Sorry in advance, it's all in one long code block. I've divided it up into three subnamespaces:

  • FakeDomain (holds mocks for example)
  • UsingParams (holds implementation that uses params keyword)
  • UsingGenerics (holds implementation that uses generics)

See below:

using System;
using System.Timers;
using StackOverflow.Answers.InjectTaskWithVaryingParameters.FakeDomain;

namespace StackOverflow.Answers.InjectTaskWithVaryingParameters
{
    public static class ExampleUsage
    {
        public static void Example1()
        {
            // using timed task runner with no parameters

            var timedProcess = new UsingParams.TimedProcess(300, FakeWork.NoParameters);

            var timedProcess2 = new UsingGenerics.TimedProcess(300, FakeWork.NoParameters);
        }

        public static void Example2()
        {
            // using timed task runner with a single typed parameter 

            var timedProcess =
                new UsingParams.TimedProcess(300,
                    p => FakeWork.SingleParameter((string)p[0]),
                    "test"
                );

            var timedProcess2 =
                new UsingGenerics.TimedProcess<StringParameter>(
                        300,
                        p => FakeWork.SingleParameter(p.Name),
                        new StringParameter()
                        {
                            Name = "test"
                        }
                );
        }

        public static void Example3()
        {
            // using timed task runner with a bunch of variously typed parameters 

            var timedProcess =
                new UsingParams.TimedProcess(300,
                    p => FakeWork.LotsOfParameters(
                        (string)p[0],
                        (DateTime)p[1],
                        (int)p[2]),
                    "test",
                    DateTime.Now,
                    123
                );

            var timedProcess2 =
                new UsingGenerics.TimedProcess<LotsOfParameters>(
                    300,
                    p => FakeWork.LotsOfParameters(
                        p.Name,
                        p.Date,
                        p.Count),
                    new LotsOfParameters()
                    {
                        Name = "test",
                        Date = DateTime.Now,
                        Count = 123
                    }
                );
        }
    }

    /* 
     * Some mock objects for example.
     * 
     */
    namespace FakeDomain
    {
        public static class FakeWork
        {
            public static void NoParameters()
            {
            }
            public static void SingleParameter(string name)
            {
            }
            public static void LotsOfParameters(string name, DateTime Date, int count)
            {
            }
        }

        public class StringParameter
        {
            public string Name { get; set; }
        }

        public class LotsOfParameters
        {
            public string Name { get; set; }
            public DateTime Date { get; set; }
            public int Count { get; set; }
        }
    }

    /*
     * Advantages: 
     *      - no additional types required         
     * Disadvantages
     *      - not strongly typed
     *      - requires explicit casting
     *      - requires "positional" array references 
     *      - no compile time checking for type safety/correct indexing position
     *      - harder to maintin if parameters change
     */
    namespace UsingParams
    {
        public delegate void NoParametersWrapperDelegate();
        public delegate void ParamsWrapperDelegate(params object[] parameters);

        public class TimedProcess : IDisposable
        {
            public TimedProcess()
                : this(0)
            {
            }

            public TimedProcess(int interval)
            {
                if (interval > 0)
                    InitTimer(interval);
            }

            public TimedProcess(int interval, NoParametersWrapperDelegate task)
                : this(interval, p => task(), null) { }

            public TimedProcess(int interval, ParamsWrapperDelegate task, params object[] parameters)
                : this(interval)
            {
                _task = task;
                _parameters = parameters;
            }

            private Timer timer;
            private ParamsWrapperDelegate _task;
            private object[] _parameters;

            public bool InProcess { get; protected set; }

            public bool Running
            {
                get
                {
                    return timer.Enabled;
                }
            }

            private void InitTimer(int interval)
            {
                if (timer == null)
                {
                    timer = new Timer();
                    timer.Elapsed += TimerElapsed;
                }
                timer.Interval = interval;
            }

            public void InitExecuteProcess()
            {
                timer.Stop();
                InProcess = true;
                RunTask();
                InProcess = false;
                timer.Start();
            }

            public void RunTask()
            {
                TimedProcessRunner.RunTask(_task, _parameters);
            }

            public void TimerElapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
            {
                InitExecuteProcess();
            }

            public void Start()
            {
                if (timer != null && timer.Interval > 0)
                    timer.Start();
            }

            public void Start(int interval)
            {
                InitTimer(interval);
                Start();
            }

            public void Stop()
            {
                timer.Stop();
            }

            private bool disposed = false;

            public void Dispose(bool disposing)
            {
                if (disposed || !disposing)
                    return;

                timer.Dispose();

                disposed = true;
            }

            public void Dispose()
            {
                Dispose(true);
            }

            ~TimedProcess()
            {
                Dispose(false);
            }
        }

        public static class TimedProcessRunner
        {
            public static void RunTask(ParamsWrapperDelegate task)
            {
                RunTask(task, null);
            }

            public static void RunTask(ParamsWrapperDelegate task, params object[] parameters)
            {
                task.Invoke(parameters);
            }
        }
    }

    /*
     * Advantage of this method: 
     *      - everything is strongly typed         
     *      - compile time and "IDE time" verified
     * Disadvantages:
     *      - requires more custom types 
     */
    namespace UsingGenerics
    {
        public class TimedProcess : TimedProcess<object>
        {
            public TimedProcess()
                : base() { }
            public TimedProcess(int interval)
                : base(interval) { }
            public TimedProcess(int interval, NoParametersWrapperDelegate task)
                : base(interval, task) { }
        }

        public class TimedProcess<TParam>
        {
            public TimedProcess()
                : this(0)
            {
            }

            public TimedProcess(int interval)
            {
                if (interval > 0)
                    InitTimer(interval);
            }
            public TimedProcess(int interval, NoParametersWrapperDelegate task)
                : this(interval, p => task(), default(TParam)) { }

            public TimedProcess(int interval, WrapperDelegate<TParam> task, TParam parameters)
                : this(interval)
            {
                _task = task;
                _parameters = parameters;
            }

            private Timer timer;
            private WrapperDelegate<TParam> _task;
            private TParam _parameters;

            public bool InProcess { get; protected set; }

            public bool Running
            {
                get
                {
                    return timer.Enabled;
                }
            }

            private void InitTimer(int interval)
            {
                if (timer == null)
                {
                    timer = new Timer();
                    timer.Elapsed += TimerElapsed;
                }
                timer.Interval = interval;
            }

            public void InitExecuteProcess()
            {
                timer.Stop();
                InProcess = true;
                RunTask();
                InProcess = false;
                timer.Start();
            }

            public void RunTask()
            {
                TaskRunner.RunTask(_task, _parameters);
            }

            public void TimerElapsed(object sender, ElapsedEventArgs e)
            {
                InitExecuteProcess();
            }

            public void Start()
            {
                if (timer != null && timer.Interval > 0)
                    timer.Start();
            }

            public void Start(int interval)
            {
                InitTimer(interval);
                Start();
            }

            public void Stop()
            {
                timer.Stop();
            }

            private bool disposed = false;

            public void Dispose(bool disposing)
            {
                if (disposed || !disposing)
                    return;

                timer.Dispose();

                disposed = true;
            }

            public void Dispose()
            {
                Dispose(true);
            }

            ~TimedProcess()
            {
                Dispose(false);
            }
        }

        public delegate void NoParametersWrapperDelegate();
        public delegate void WrapperDelegate<TParam>(TParam parameters);

        public static class TaskRunner
        {
            public static void RunTask<TParam>(WrapperDelegate<TParam> task)
            {
                RunTask(task, default(TParam));
            }

            public static void RunTask<TParam>(WrapperDelegate<TParam> task, TParam parameters)
            {
                task.Invoke(parameters);
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

If your method parameter or property for the delegate is just of type Delegate you can use it's DynamicInvoke method to call the delegate, no matter what it's signature is. Like so:

public void CallDelegate(Delegate del) {
  result = del.DynamicInvoke(1, 2, 3, 'A', 'B', 'C');
}

You really should be able to use a strong typed delegate, probably an Func or Action that can take whatever parameters you need to pass to the proccess.

public void CallDelegate(Func<int, int, char, char> del) {
  result = del(1, 2, 'A', 'B');
}

Personally, I would create an interface that all of the processes had to implement, then have the service discover all of the objects that implement it. That way they could provide their timing needs and a strongly typed method to call to the service. Something like this:

//The interface
interface ITimerProcess {
  TimeSpan Period {get;}
  void PerformAction(string someInfo);
}

//A process
class SayHelloProcess : ITimerProcess {

  public TimeSpan Period { get { return TimeSpan.FromHours(1); } }

  public void PerformAction(string someInfo) {
    Console.WriteLine("Hello, {0}!", someInfo);
  }
}

For brievity I'll end it there, your service could descover all the process by looking for classes that implement ITimerProcess, then creating a timer for each based on the Period property each exposes. The timer would just have to call PerformAction with any other extra data you would like to pass.

share|improve this answer
    
One question regarding the second code block - my Timed Windows Service wouldn't know what the process parameters were because they're unique for each process given database dependencies, web service dependencies and other such dependencies. So I'm not sure how I could use that, although that kind of is where my train of thought was going... your final paragraph did inspire another thought process regarding plugins which I may explore. – BobTheBuilder Oct 21 '09 at 15:45

Are you looking for:- params object[] parameterValues

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/w5zay9db%28VS.71%29.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Basic as that concept is, I have to admit, I'd completely overlooked it. Usually the process itself requires specific arguments/types. I was hoping not to have to do any special coding in the process to take it from an untimed process to making it a timer initialized one. – BobTheBuilder Oct 21 '09 at 15:50

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