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I'm going through the learn.knockoutjs.com tutorial and I'm at step 4 of the custom bindings tutorial. There is the following JavaScript:

update: function(element, valueAccessor) {
    // Give the first x stars the "chosen" class, where x <= rating
    var observable = valueAccessor();
    $("span", element).each(function(index) {
        $(this).toggleClass("chosen", index < observable());
    });
}

I have translated it to the following TypeScript:

update: (element, valueAccessor) => {
    var observable = valueAccessor();
    $("span", element).each(index => {
        $(this).toggleClass('chosen', index < observable())
    });
}

This creates the following, where a _this variable is created to preserve the scope of the "update" function, rather than the internal "span" function.

update: function (element, valueAccessor) {
    var _this = this;
    var observable = valueAccessor();
    $("span", element).each(function (index) {
        $(_this).toggleClass('chosen', index < observable());
    });
}

The problem is with $(_this). How do I get TypeScript to give me the real $(this).

share|improve this question
    
@Esailija has the best solution by far. Simply don't use $(this) at all, but use the named parameter to the each callback instead. Basically, you should never use the implicit this in an each callback. Besides the problems you're having here, it is very bad for readability. The named parameter solves it much more cleanly. –  Michael Geary Apr 16 '13 at 7:22

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Well the typescript doing _this is the more intuitive one for many, in fact code like this causes multiple duplicates per day on Stackoverflow:

  update: function() {
     $(elem).click(function(){
          this.save();
     });
  }

this is not the same this because in js this works differently from other languages - it has a separate binding for every function call.

Typescript would make the above work as expected by many newcomers to js:

  update: function() {
     //this is the object with update, save methods etc
     $(elem).click( () => {
          this.save();  //this is still the object with update, save methods etc
     });
  }

There is usually a way to refer to what you want even when using fat arrow:

update: function() {
    $(elem).click( (event) => {
        $(event.currentTarget).hide() //same as $(this).hide() with normal function
        this.save(); //Stays intuitive to non-javascripters
    });
}

Or with your example:

update: function() {
    $("span", element).each( (index, elem) => {
        $(elem).toggleClass('chosen', index < observable())
        this.save(); //stays intuitive to non-javascripters
    });
}

Of course for experienced Javascripters that are used to the JS-behavior of this, it might not be so intuitive.

Btw I am not 100% on the typescript syntax...

share|improve this answer
    
Your last version is by far the best solution. Don't use $(this) at all! –  Michael Geary Apr 16 '13 at 7:20

The answer is very simple. Do not use a lambda.

update: (element, valueAccessor) => {
    var observable = valueAccessor();
    $("span", element).each(function (index) {
        $(this).toggleClass('chosen', index < observable())
    });
}

Note that the difference is that this code uses ... element).each(function (index)... instead of the lambda

I do not understand why so if someone could post why, that'd be great.

share|improve this answer
    
don't you hate when you post a question and then quickly find the solution? :) –  Katana24 Apr 15 '13 at 12:44
1  
How is this any different from the code in your question? –  Pointy Apr 15 '13 at 12:48
1  
@Pointy it uses function (index) {} instead of index => {} –  Esailija Apr 15 '13 at 13:40
1  
I think the answer to 'why' is simply 'by design'. As you have discovered, fat arrows generate a little extra JS to make it easier to preserve the current scope. See section 4.9 of the spec: typescriptlang.org/Content/… –  JcFx Apr 15 '13 at 18:21
1  
In typescript a lambda will declare an exterior _this variable which will save the "real" value of 'this'. Anywhere that you reference 'this' inside of the lambda gets compiled down to '_this', hence resulting in a different 'this' value. –  N. Taylor Mullen Apr 15 '13 at 22:54

Esailija has the right idea here: don't use $(this) in the callback at all. Your code will be much cleaner with a named parameter.

As another example of how that helps, consider this simple jQuery plugin:

// Set a random opacity on each of the elements in a jQuery object
jQuery.fn.randomOpacity = function() {
    return this.each( function() {
        $(this).css({ opacity: Math.random() });
    });
};

Ouch. Can a piece of code possibly get any more confusing than that? this appears on two lines in a row, and it means completely different things.

Instead, use the named parameter:

// Set a random opacity on each of the elements in a jQuery object
jQuery.fn.randomOpacity = function() {
    return this.each( function( i, element ) {
        $(element).css({ opacity: Math.random() });
    });
};

That is much more clear.

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