Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I got this output by decoding JSON data.

Now I want to reverse this data structure and print it using Perl.

Can anyone can help me with the code snippet below?

I have this data in one variable and I printed it. My output is as shown below

I have a hash of hashes that looks like this:

$VAR1 = {
    'Packet Loss to Source' => {
        '142' => {
            '161' => '0.000',
            '162' => '0.000',
            '141' => '0.000'
        }
    },
    'Packet Loss to Destination' => {
        '142' => {
            '161' => '0.000',
            '162' => '0.000',
            '141' => '0.000'
        }
    },
    'Average Jitter to Source' => {
        '142' => {
            '161' => '13.323',
            '162' => '37.003',
            '141' => '192.309'
        }
    },
    'Availability' => {
        '142' => {
            '161' => '0.000',
            '162' => '0.000',
            '141' => '1.042'
        }
    },
    'Average Round Trip Time' => {
        '142' => {
            '161' => '772.278',
            '162' => '389.566',
            '141' => '8557.511'
        }
    },
    'Average Jitter to Destination' => {

        '142' => {
            '161' => '13.323',
            '162' => '37.003',
            '141' => '192.309'
        }
    }
};

This is the code which I tried to get the output. I read the text file and get the JSON data, decode that and print it. I got the above output in variable $perl_obj.

#my $dirname = "/home/brix/ravikiran/doc/demo.txt";
my $dirname = "/home/brix/ravikiran/doc/JSONData.txt";

open HANDLE, $dirname;
my @raw_data = <HANDLE>;
my $json_text;
foreach my $row (@raw_data) {
    $json_text .= $row;
}
close(HANDLE);

print "$json_text;\n";
my $json = JSON::XS->new();
$json = json->pretty(1)->
    space_before(1)->
    space_after(1)->
    canonical(1)->
    allow_blessed(1)->
    convert_blessed(1);

my $perl_obj = $json->decode($json_text);
print STDOUT Dumper($perl_obj);
share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by pilcrow, Borodin, DarkAjax, Steven Penny, Graviton Apr 17 '13 at 8:35

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
What do you mean by "reverse"? You know that '161' => '0.000', '162' => '0.000' cannot be reversed so that key -> value, and value -> key, because the values are identical (and would overwrite each other). –  TLP Apr 15 '13 at 12:59
3  
Before posting, please take some time to make your question at least readable. –  sidyll Apr 15 '13 at 13:01
2  
What is your actual question? You've given us code and output, but no errors. If you are asking how to 'reverse the data structure', you're going to have to clarify what you mean by that. –  RickF Apr 15 '13 at 13:38
    
in the vein of TLP's question, do you wish to return a map onto lists of values for the non-invertible part of your original hash map ? –  collapsar Apr 15 '13 at 13:39
2  
Hmm. Why do you have a text file called $dirname? –  Borodin Apr 15 '13 at 13:57

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You probably don't want to reverse any of the hashes (at least in the sense Perl uses that keyword), because that involves swapping keys and values. What you probably want to do is change the order of the keys in your multi-level hash.

Here is how you could swap the outer two layers:

use warnings;
use strict;

my $new_obj;
foreach my $outer_key (keys %$perl_obj)
{
    foreach my $inner_key (keys %{$perl_obj->{$outer_key}})
    {
        $new_obj->{$inner_key}->{$outer_key} = 
            $perl_obj->{$outer_key}->{$inner_key};  
    }
}

use Data::Dumper;
print Dumper $new_obj;

Output:

$VAR1 = {
          '142' => {
                     'Packet Loss to Source' => {
                                                  '161' => '0.000',
                                                  '162' => '0.000',
                                                  '141' => '0.000'
                                                },
                     'Packet Loss to Destination' => {
                                                       '161' => '0.000',
                                                       '162' => '0.000',
                                                       '141' => '0.000'
                                                     },
          ...etc...

You could completely invert it like this:

my $new_obj;
foreach my $outer_key (keys %$perl_obj)
{
    foreach my $inner_key (keys %{$perl_obj->{$outer_key}})
    {
        foreach my $innest_key (keys %{$perl_obj->{$outer_key}->{$inner_key}})
        {
            $new_obj->{$innest_key}->{$inner_key}->{$outer_key} = 
                $perl_obj->{$outer_key}->{$inner_key}->{$innest_key};   
        }
    }
}

use Data::Dumper;
print Dumper $new_obj;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Very much It works –  ravikiran Apr 16 '13 at 6:23

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.