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How can I test this in a async manner?

it('Should test something.', function (done) {

    var req = someRequest,
        mock = sinon.mock(response),
        stub = sinon.stub(someObject, 'method');

     // returns a promise
     stub.withArgs('foo').returns(Q.resolve(5));

     mock.expects('bar').once().withArgs(200);

     request(req, response);

     mock.verify();

});

And here is the method to test.

var request = function (req, response) {

    ...

    someObject.method(someParameter)
        .then(function () {
            res.send(200);
        })
        .fail(function () {
            res.send(500);
        });

};

As you can see I am using node.js, Q (for the promise), sinon for mocking and stubbing and mocha as the test environment. The test above fails because of the async behaviour from the request method and I don't know when to call done() in the test.

share|improve this question
    
Easiest way i found in working with async calls, when you want to use the response, was to break the function in 2 at the point where the response is needed and call the second part when the response is received. – cosmin.danisor Apr 15 '13 at 13:50

You need to call done once all the async operations have finished. When do you think that would be? How would you normally wait until a request is finished?

it('Should test something.', function (done) {

   var req = someRequest,
       mock = sinon.mock(response),
       stub = sinon.stub(someObject, 'method');

    // returns a promise
    stub.withArgs('foo').returns(Q.resolve(5));

    mock.expects('bar').once().withArgs(200);

    request(req, response).then(function(){
       mock.verify();
       done();
    });

});

It might also be a good idea to mark your test as failing in an errorcallback attached to the request promise.

share|improve this answer
    
The request method is not a promise for itself. So there is no .then method to call. I would wait until response.send is called. Unfortunately the request method terminates before that happens. – Stefan Apr 15 '13 at 14:50
1  
Maybe the core of this problem didn't came out quiet good. I usually yield the callback from someObject.method like so stub.withArgs('foo').yields(5). In this case the callback function is getting executed immediately. But now, with promises, I only return a deferred object and the resolve and reject handler get called to late because the request method has already terminated. Therefor the mock objects didn't get verified. If I wrap the verify method in a setTimeout with a call to done with it the test passes. setTimeout(function () { mock.verify(); done(); }, 100) – Stefan Apr 15 '13 at 15:10
    
Hmm, in my experience it's good practice for asynchronous methods to provide some way of knowing when they will complete - to do this you can either accept a callback parameter, or return a promise. Depending which method you use, you can call the "end of test" code there. – David McMullin Apr 15 '13 at 15:29
    
You are right, if I do want to use promisses then I need to implement the responses send method with a call to done in it. But in that case I can forget about using mocks... – Stefan Apr 16 '13 at 10:20

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