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So I don't have much Ruby knowledge but need to work on a simple script. I'll try to explain my dilemma in detail, but let me know if you still need clarification.

My script involves sets of 3 numbers each. Let's say, for example, we have these three pieces of information for each person: Age, Size, and Score. So, I need to have a way of assessing if a person exists with a certain Age and Size. If so, then I would like to output the score of that person.

The only way I know of to keep track of this information is to create 3 separate arrays, each containing one piece of information. I can check if the age is included in one array, if so I can find its index (each value in each category will be unique -- so no "ages," "sizes," or "scores" will be repeated). I can then check if the value at the same index in the size array matches the specified size. If so, I can output the score found within the third array at the same index. I would prefer not to do it this way and, instead, to keep each person's age, size, and score together.

So, I've tried arrays within an array like this:

testarray = [
  [27, 8, 92],
  [52, 12, 84]
]

The problem with this, however, is that I'm not sure how to access the values within those subarrays. So I know I could use something like testarray.include?(27) to check if 27 is present within the main array, but how would I check if 27 and 8 are the first two values within a subarray of testarray and, if so, then output the third value of the subarray, 92.

Then I tried an array of hashes, as below:

testarrayb = [
{ :age => 27, :size => 8, :score => 92 },
{ :age => 52, :size => 12, :score => 84 }
]

I know I can use testarrayb[0][:score] to get 92 but how can I first check if the array contains a hash that has both the specified age and size and, if it does, output the score of that hash? Something similar to testarrayb[:age].include?(value) where the age of each hash is checked and then the size of the same hash is checked. If both match specified values, then the score of that hash is outputted.

I'd appreciate extremely appreciate it if someone can point me in the right direction. Feel free to demonstrate a more efficient and completely different technique if that's what you'd recommend. Thanks for your time!

share|improve this question
    
How you want to display the output? means in what format? –  Arup Rakshit Apr 15 '13 at 13:47
    
I'd just like to set the number (of the score) to a variable. –  user2282529 Apr 15 '13 at 13:58
    
Yes, I have given the answer. Hope you can now use it. :) –  Arup Rakshit Apr 15 '13 at 14:21

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Why not create a simple class to represent your data, e.g. using Struct. Then provide some class methods to handle the filtering.

Entry = Struct.new(:age, :size, :score) do
  # Holds the data (example)
  def self.entries; @entries ||= [] end

  # Example filtering method
  def self.score_by_age_and_size(age, size)
    entry = entries.find { |e| e.age == age && e.size == size }
    entry.score if entry
  end
end

# Add some entries
Entry.entries << Entry.new(27, 8, 92)
Entry.entries << Entry.new(52, 13, 90)

# Get score
Entry.score_by_age_and_size(27, 8) # => 92
Entry.score_by_age_and_size(27, 34) # => nil
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much for the time and suggestion. I am bookmarking this page for reference. I really appreciate your input. –  user2282529 Apr 16 '13 at 3:53

This will return an array of hashes that satisfy the conditions and then assign the score of the first hash in the returned array of hashes.

# return an array of hashes that satisfy the conditions
array_of_hashes = testarrayb.select { |h| h[:age] == 27 && h[:size] == 8 }

# assign the score
score = array_of_hashes[0][:score]

EDIT: you probably want to put this in a method

# use an instance variable to reference the initial array defined outside this method
@testarrayb = [{:age=>27, :size=>8, :score=>92}, {:age=>52, :size=>12, :score=>84}]

def find_person(age, size)
  array_of_hashes = @testarrayb.select { |h| h[:age] == age && h[:size] == size }

  # since values in each column are unique we can assume array size of 0 or 1
  # return false if not found otherwise return the score
  !array_of_hashes.empty? && array_of_hashes[0][:score]
end

and call it like this:

find_person 27, 8
# => 92 

find_person 27, 7
# => false
share|improve this answer
    
why you consider only h[:age] == 27 && h[:size] == 8 ? not other conditions? –  Arup Rakshit Apr 15 '13 at 15:29
    
@RubyLovely - do you mean other values for age and size? –  seph Apr 15 '13 at 18:29
    
yes, you are right :) –  Arup Rakshit Apr 15 '13 at 18:34
    
Thank you so much. I'm currently doing it this way and it's working perfectly. –  user2282529 Apr 16 '13 at 3:52

Would a hash of hashes do the trick for you?

testhash = {27 => {8 => 92}, 52 => {12 => 84}}
p testhash             # {27=>{8=>92}, 52=>{12=>84}}
p testhash[27][8]      # 92
p testhash[27][42]     # nil
testhash[27][42] = 99
p testhash             # {27=>{8=>92, 42=>99}, 52=>{12=>84}}
p testhash[27][42]     # 99

As long as the age/size pairs are unique, this should be quite efficient.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much for the time and suggestion. I am bookmarking this page for reference. I really appreciate your input. The pairs would be unique so this also sounds like a solution to my issue. –  user2282529 Apr 16 '13 at 3:58
    
You're welcome. Given that the pairs are unique, I think you'll find that the hash-based solutions are much faster than the select-based solutions if you have to scale this up to large datasets. –  pjs Apr 17 '13 at 4:10

From what I can tell from your requirements ("I need to have a way of assessing if a person exists with a certain Age and Size", "How can I first check if the array contains a hash that has both the specified age and size"), you always identify a person by the pair of their age and size, and you want to refer to their score based on that pair as the key. Since Ruby allows any type of Object as keys (or value) in Hashes, we can translate that directly:

# `scores` hash is structured { [age, size] => score, ... }
scores = {[27, 8] => 92, [52, 12] => 84}

You can ask if a person exists with a certain age and size pair:

scores.include?([27, 8])  # => true
scores.include?([27, 7])  # => false
scores.include?([28, 8])  # => false
scores.include?([52, 12]) # => true

and you can assign a new score to a person (again, identified by age/size pair):

scores[[52, 12]] = 97
scores                    # => {[27, 8]=>92, [52, 12]=>97}

Or course, since you want to access the value, you can always just test for nil after:

score = scores[[27, 8]]   # `score` is now `92`
if !score.nil?
  # Do something with `score`
end

I prefer using an Array to represent a pair, but another option is to use a Hash so you can name the elements for clarity and not worry about order:

scores = {{:age => 27, :size => 8} => 92, {:age => 52, :size => 12} => 84}
scores[{:size => 8, :age => 27}] # => 92
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much for the time and suggestion. I am bookmarking this page for reference. I really appreciate your inpu and, particularly, the explanations. I really liked this way of doing it since it's quite simplified. –  user2282529 Apr 16 '13 at 3:57

you could probably do something like this:

[
  { age: 27, size: 8,  score: 92 },
  { age: 52, size: 12, score: 84 }
].map { |e| e[:age] == 27 && e[:size] == 8 ? e[:score] : nil }.compact

map will return a new array with the result of the block (which gives you e[:score] if the condition match or nil if they dont. compact then will remove the unwanted nil in the resulting array.

However this behavior sounds like its a good fit for its own class, because what I've just shown contains a lot of hard-coded stuff (especially the condition to select the entries on), which is bad. Maybe try to figure out a nice class for this?

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much for the time and suggestion. I am bookmarking this page for reference. I really appreciate your input. –  user2282529 Apr 16 '13 at 3:53
def person_score (*input)
    testarray = [
    [27, 8, 92],
    [52, 12, 84]
    ]
        testarray.each_with_object("") do|i,mem| 
            h = Hash[*([:age,:size,:score].zip(i).flatten)]
            (h.values.first(2) == input) ? (return h[:score]) : ( mem.replace("age and size not matched"))
        end
end

p person_score(27,12)  #=> "age and size not matched" 
p person_score(27,8)   #=> 92
p person_score(52,44)  #=> "age and size not matched"
p person_score(52,12)  #=> 84
share|improve this answer
    
1.) i think its bad to have an array where the position of the value in the array should transport its meaning. I think a hash in this case is the way to go { age: 27, size: 8, score: 92 } is clearer then [27, 8, 92] in my opinion. 2.) It will not return all scores if there's more than one element that matches the criteria. –  Sascha Kaestle Apr 15 '13 at 15:16
    
@SaschaKaestle why you consider that? why are you assuming? Did the user say anything about that? in SO we never assume anything, what requested, we care only that part. OP told us the three tuple values only. So my answer is right. It will not return all scores if there's more than one element that matches the criteria. - Do you think your one also be handle that things. It will give only last one. –  Arup Rakshit Apr 15 '13 at 15:26
    
Well not to get into an argument, but yes, my answer will handle finding two elements that match correctly. I still think your answer transports some incorrect ideas (array vs. array of hashes for one; this is a clear usecase for an array of hashes). I'm not able to remove the downvote, otherwise I would, as the information is not dangerously incorrect. –  Sascha Kaestle Apr 15 '13 at 15:45
    
@SaschaKaestle I am not getting you. I think you didn't understand what OP asked. or may be me too. –  Arup Rakshit Apr 15 '13 at 16:15
    
Thank you so much for the time and suggestion. I am bookmarking this page for reference. I really appreciate your input. Only one set will ever match the criteria of both age and size so this does sound like it would work for what I had in mind. –  user2282529 Apr 16 '13 at 3:55

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