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I'm having an issue with replacing a string in java...

the line is:

subject = subject.replaceAll("\\[calEvent\\]", calSubject);

This line doesn’t work with $ sign in calSubject.

what the subject variable is, a dynamic subject line variable from a file. for example like so: Calnot = [calEvent]

what i am trying to do is replace the calEvent place holder with the subject variable. but how i did it does not work because it crashes when the subject contains a $ sign.

any idea how I can do this so it won't break if the subject contains a $ sign or any characters for that matter?

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When you say it crashes, what do you mean? Do you have a stack trace or does it simply not replace anything? –  The Cat Apr 15 '13 at 15:22
    
Are you getting IllegalArgumentException? –  Jops Apr 15 '13 at 15:26
    
error is: java.lang.IndexOutOfBoundsException: No group 3 –  OakvilleWork Apr 15 '13 at 18:10
    
@OakvilleWork which is logical, if it interprets the dollar sign as a capturing group reference, it tries to replace it with the corresponding group, if there are no such group, it throws an out-of-bound exception. –  zakinster Apr 15 '13 at 18:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

That's because the dollar sign is a special character in a replacement string, use Matcher.quoteReplacement() to escape this kind of character.

subject = subject.replaceAll("\\[calEvent\\]", Matcher.quoteReplacement(calSubject));

From the doc of String.replaceAll() :

Note that backslashes (\) and dollar signs ($) in the replacement string may cause the results to be different than if it were being treated as a literal replacement string; see Matcher.replaceAll. Use Matcher.quoteReplacement(java.lang.String) to suppress the special meaning of these characters, if desired.

Note that the dollar sign is used to refer to the corresponding capturing groups in the regular expression ($0, $1, etc.).

EDIT

Matcher.quoteReplacement() has been introduced in Java 1.5, if you're stuck in Java 1.4 you have to escape $ manually by replacing it with \$ inside the string. But since String.replaceAll() would also take the \ and the $ as special characters you have to escape them once and you also have to escape all \ once more for the Java runtime.

("$", "\$") /* what we want */
("\$", "\\\$") /* RegExp engine escape */
("\\$", "\\\\\\$") /* Java runtime escape */

So we get :

calSubject = calSubject.replaceAll("\\$", "\\\\\\$");  
share|improve this answer
    
hi thanks so much for the suggestion.. the program uses java 1.4, and it doesn't seem to be working. hard to say because i can't debug it locally. just using logs for solving it. does java 1.4 not support: Matcher.quoteReplacement? –  OakvilleWork Apr 15 '13 at 17:24
    
See my last edit. –  zakinster Apr 15 '13 at 18:06
    
thanks so much! –  OakvilleWork Apr 15 '13 at 19:08

if you don't need the regex feature, you can consider to use this method of String class: replace(CharSequence target,CharSequence replacement)

It saves your "escape" backslashes as well.

api doc:

Replaces each substring of this string that matches the literal target sequence with the specified literal replacement sequence. The replacement proceeds from the beginning of the string to the end, for example, replacing "aa" with "b" in the string "aaa" will result in "ba" rather than "ab".

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can you provide an example of this? –  OakvilleWork Apr 15 '13 at 18:03
1  
That overload of the replace() method was added in JDK 1.5, and the OP is stuck with JDK 1.4. And you can't use replace(char, char) because the new value is not a single char. –  Alan Moore Apr 15 '13 at 18:37
    
@AlanMoore when I posted, OP didn't mention any information about 1.4. but you are right, this method is there since 1.5. –  Kent Apr 15 '13 at 19:30

From the documentation of replaceAll:

Note that backslashes () and dollar signs ($) in the replacement string may cause the results to be different than if it were being treated as a literal replacement string; see Matcher.replaceAll. Use java.util.regex.Matcher.quoteReplacement to suppress the special meaning of these characters, if desired.

And in Matcher.replaceAll

Dollar signs may be treated as references to captured subsequences as described above, and backslashes are used to escape literal characters in the replacement string.

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Not sure I really understand your question but try

subject = subject.replaceAll("\\[calEvent\\]", Matcher.quoteReplacement(calSubject));
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Please use

Matcher.quoteReplacement(calEvent);
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