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I have some weird performance results that I cannot quite explain. It seems that this line

d = new double[4, 4]{{1, 0, 0, 0},
                     {0, 1, 0, 0},
                     {0, 0, 1, 0},
                     {0, 0, 0, 1},};

is 4 times slower than this one

d = new double[4, 4];
d[0, 0] = 1; d[0, 1] = 0; d[0, 2] = 0; d[0, 3] = 0; 
d[1, 0] = 0; d[1, 1] = 1; d[1, 2] = 0; d[1, 3] = 0;
d[2, 0] = 0; d[2, 1] = 0; d[2, 2] = 1; d[2, 3] = 0;
d[3, 0] = 0; d[3, 1] = 0; d[3, 2] = 0; d[3, 3] = 1;

(and that is not even considering the fact that in this example I could leave out all those = 0 assignments)

I know that looping over a multidimensional array in c# can be slow due to the boundary checks. But there is no loop here, no boundary checks are required, and the whole array initializer line can be resolved at compile time.

The second code block however has to first initialize the array to zero, then overwrite each value individually.
So what is the problem here?

And what would be the best way to initialize this array if performance is an issue?


I used the following code to measure performance:

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
class Program
{
    public static double[,] d; // global static variable to prevent the JIT optimizing it away

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Stopwatch watch;
        int numIter = 10000000; // repeat all tests this often

        double[,] d2 = new double[4, 4]{{1, 0, 0, 0},
                                        {0, 1, 0, 0},
                                        {0, 0, 1, 0},
                                        {0, 0, 0, 1},};

        // ================================================================
        // use arrayInitializer: slowest
        watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int i = 0; i < numIter; i++)
        {
            d = new double[4, 4]{{1, 0, 0, 0},
                                {0, 1, 0, 0},
                                {0, 0, 1, 0},
                                {0, 0, 0, 1},};
        }
        Console.WriteLine("ArrayInitializer: \t{0:0.##########}ms", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds * 1.0 / numIter);

        // ================================================================
        // use Array.Copy: faster
        watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int i = 0; i < numIter; i++)
        {
            d = new double[4, 4];
            Array.Copy(d2, d, d2.Length);
        }
        Console.WriteLine("new + Array.Copy: \t{0:0.##########}ms", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds * 1.0 / numIter);

        // ================================================================
        // direct assignment: fastest
        watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
        for (int i = 0; i < numIter; i++)
        {
            d = new double[4, 4];
            d[0, 0] = 1; d[0, 1] = 0; d[0, 2] = 0; d[0, 3] = 0; 
            d[1, 0] = 0; d[1, 1] = 1; d[1, 2] = 0; d[1, 3] = 0;
            d[2, 0] = 0; d[2, 1] = 0; d[2, 2] = 1; d[2, 3] = 0;
            d[3, 0] = 0; d[3, 1] = 0; d[3, 2] = 0; d[3, 3] = 1;
        }
        Console.WriteLine("direct assignment: \t{0:0.##########}ms", watch.ElapsedMilliseconds * 1.0 / numIter);
    }
}

The results:

ArrayInitializer:       0,0007917ms
new + Array.Copy:       0,0002739ms
direct assignment:      0,0002281ms
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Taking a look at compiled IL the code is very very different. The ArrayInitializer uses a method, RuntimeHelpers.InitializeArray. But that is the best I can do...Interesting question! –  Aron Apr 15 '13 at 15:49
    
You never use the array that's created, so won't the entire array allocation just be optimized away by the compiler? –  Servy Apr 15 '13 at 17:43
    
That is why i made the array public static. If it is just a local variable, it is indeed optimized away, but only for the first test case with the array initializer. But if d is a static variable there should be no such optimization, since another thread could conceivably access it; and the timing tests seem to confirm this. –  HugoRune Apr 15 '13 at 17:50
    
For comparison, using mono runtime on OSX, I get ArrayInitializer: 0.0006183ms new + Array.Copy: 0.0053461ms direct assignment: 0.0005756ms –  mtadd Apr 15 '13 at 18:51
    
Are you compiling release mode ? –  Marwijn Apr 16 '13 at 13:24
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1 Answer

Here is good explanation of array initializers and why you see such different results: http://bartdesmet.net/blogs/bart/archive/2008/08/21/how-c-array-initializers-work.aspx

Basically - array initializer involves creation of custom structs, while direct assigning of each item is just direct assignment in the stack and though it faster.

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