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I'm having difficulty figuring out exactly what needs to be indexed to make my queries as efficient as possible. The table used has billions of rows, so without an index it's useless.

I understand that when I search for something with WHERE ... AND that these columns should be indexed together, but I don't understand how the indexes apply in more complicated situations like with COUNT and ORDER BY.

Please could someone tell me what indexes I need for the following queries:

Query 1:

SELECT word1,word2,COUNT(id) AS aaa
  FROM mytable
  WHERE (word1>0 AND word2=429907) OR (word1=429907 AND word2>0)
  GROUP BY word1,word2
  ORDER BY aaa DESC LIMIT 20;

Query 2:

CREATE TEMPORARY TABLE temptbl (
  pibn INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL, page SMALLINT UNSIGNED NOT NULL)
  ENGINE=MEMORY;
INSERT INTO temptbl (
  SELECT DISTINCT pibn,page FROM mytable
  WHERE word1=429907 AND word2=0);
ALTER TABLE temptbl ADD PRIMARY KEY (pibn,page);
SELECT word1,word2,COUNT(id) AS aaa
  FROM mytable a
  INNER JOIN temptbl b
  ON a.pibn=b.pibn AND a.page=b.page
  GROUP BY word1,word2 ORDER BY aaa DESC LIMIT 10;
DROP TABLE temptbl;

Query 3:

SELECT pibn,COUNT(*) AS aaa
  FROM mytable
  WHERE word1=429907 AND word2=12322
  GROUP BY pibn ORDER BY aaa DESC LIMIT 25

Current indexes are:

id
pibn,page
word1,word2,origyear,cat

As it stands (with current indexes) Query 1 takes 13 seconds, Query 2 takes 35 seconds, and Query 3 takes 0.1 seconds (which sounds fast but I don't think it's optimized as much as it could be.)

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1  
try EXPLAINing your query, it will give you some hints as to where the bottlenecks are. –  wroniasty Apr 15 '13 at 15:41
    
what is the output of EXPLAIN ? in general it gives good hints for finding good indexes. –  Stephane Rolland Apr 15 '13 at 15:41
    
I did use EXPLAIN, but all it did was tell me which index was being used, not how efficient the index is in each case. –  Alasdair Apr 15 '13 at 15:42
    
Having an index of (word2, word1) might help the first query (although I understand mySQL doesn't necessarily have as great an optimizer as some other RDBMSs). An index of (word1, word2, pibn, page) should help queries 2 and 3. Speaking of 2, switching from a temp-table like that to a subquery-reference (eg, FROM (SELECT...) may also help. –  Clockwork-Muse Apr 15 '13 at 16:02
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1 Answer

You should review how indexes are used in MySQL here.

Your first query does not use an index, because it has an inequality in the where clause on both columns. To make this more efficient, you would need to rewrite the query and probably add another index. Also, if id is never NULL, I think you are better off with count(*). This would allow the query to complete with only a query scan.

The rewritten query would look like:

select  word1, word2, count(*)
from ((select word1, word2
       from mytable
       where word1>0 AND word2=429907
      ) union all
      (((select word1, word2
       from mytable
       where word2>0 AND word1=429907
      )
     ) t
 group by word1, word2

This query would need an index on mytable(word2, word1) for performance reasons.

This might go even faster if you do the aggregation first in the subqueries, then again at the outer level.

Your second query is probably slowed down by the count(id). It is probably using the existing index for the group by. It then needs to fetch the id from the data pages. Either add an index like mytable(word1, word2, id) or just change the code to count(*).

The third query would benefit from an index on mytable(word1, word2, pibn).

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