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When I have a link that is wired-up with a JQuery or JavaScript event such as:

<a href="#">My Link</a>

How do I prevent the page from scrolling to the top? When I remove the href attribute from the anchor the page doesn't scroll to the top but the link doesn't appear to be click-able. Thanks for the help!

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8 Answers 8

up vote 76 down vote accepted

You need to return false; in the jQuery click handler to prevent the default action from happening:

<a href="#" id="ma_link">Do something fancy</a>

Then with jQuery:

$('#ma_link').click(function(e) {
     // do something fancy
     return false; // prevent default click action from happening!
     e.preventDefault(); // same thing as above
});
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That's exactly it! Thanks man! –  Achilles Oct 21 '09 at 16:29
6  
Posted a solution (3 years late) that doesn't require attaching a click handler: stackoverflow.com/a/11246131/216941 –  Matt Crinklaw-Vogt Jun 28 '12 at 13:51
    
what a nifty solution. –  Pinch Nov 14 '12 at 20:38
    
I feel fairly strongly that @MattCrinklaw-Vogt has provided the better answer, here. Besides the fact that his way is more succinct, it's also conceptually cleaner. A href of '#' is explicitly specified as meaning 'scroll to the top of the document'. Doing things your way is effectively saying "When the user clicks this link, scroll to the top of the page" and then later saying "Hey, wait! Remember that scrolling to the top of the page thing I explicitly instructed you to do earlier? Actually, don't do that". Matt's way is just never to give the first instruction, which is simpler. –  Mark Amery Dec 30 '13 at 23:26
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Short Answer:

The simplest thing is to set your href to #! instead of #

For example,

<a href="#!">Link</a>

will not do any scrolling when clicked.

Here is a Fiddle illustrating this (just scrunch your browser down until your get a scrollbar):
http://jsfiddle.net/9dEG7/


For the spec nerds - why this works:

This behaviour is specified in the HTML5 spec under the Navigating to a fragment identifier section. The reason that a link with a href of "#" causes the document to scroll to the top is that this behaviour is explicitly specified as the way to handle an empty fragment identifier:

2. If fragid is the empty string, then the indicated part of the document is the top of the document

Using a href of "#!" instead works simply because it avoids this rule. There's nothing magic about the exclamation mark - it just makes a convenient fragment identifier because it's noticeably different to a typical fragid and unlikely to ever match the id or name of an element on your page. Indeed, we could put almost anything after the hash; the only fragids that won't suffice are the empty string, the word 'top', or strings that match name or id attributes of elements on the page.

More exactly, we just need a fragment identifier that will cause us to fall through to step 8 in the following algorithm for determining the indicated part of the document from the fragid:

  1. Apply the URL parser algorithm to the URL, and let fragid be the fragment component of the resulting parsed URL.

  2. If fragid is the empty string, then the indicated part of the document is the top of the document; stop the algorithm here.

  3. Let fragid bytes be the result of percent-decoding fragid.

  4. Let decoded fragid be the result of applying the UTF-8 decoder algorithm to fragid bytes. If the UTF-8 decoder emits a decoder error, abort the decoder and instead jump to the step labeled no decoded fragid.

  5. If there is an element in the DOM that has an ID exactly equal to decoded fragid, then the first such element in tree order is the indicated part of the document; stop the algorithm here.

  6. No decoded fragid: If there is an a element in the DOM that has a name attribute whose value is exactly equal to fragid (not decoded fragid), then the first such element in tree order is the indicated part of the document; stop the algorithm here.

  7. If fragid is an ASCII case-insensitive match for the string top, then the indicated part of the document is the top of the document; stop the algorithm here.

  8. Otherwise, there is no indicated part of the document.

As long as we hit step 8 and there is no indicated part of the document, the following rule comes into play:

If there is no indicated part ... then the user agent must do nothing.

which is why the browser doesn't scroll.

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Is this documented somewhere, or just happens to work? –  Martin Wickman Jan 31 '13 at 9:49
3  
Doesn't matter if you put '!' or any other value, as long as the id is not a part of the DOM. –  Shubham Feb 14 '13 at 16:50
    
+1....such a simple method, thanks –  Lodder Mar 15 '13 at 13:09
    
Really simple, exactly what I was looking for, thank you! –  natlines May 16 '13 at 11:24
    
Really simple and no scripting required :) Great! –  andrewktmeikle Nov 28 '13 at 10:41
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Try this:

<a href="#" onclick="return false;">My Link</a>
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Link to something more sensible than the top of the page in the first place. Then cancel the default event.

See rule 2 of pragmatic progressive enhancement.

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This also makes you site more SEO friendly. –  Frankie Oct 21 '09 at 17:21
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An easy approach is to leverage this code:

<a href="javascript:void(0);">Link Title</a>

This approach doesn't force a page refresh, so the scrollbar stays in place. Also, it allows you to programmatically change the onclick event and handle client side event binding using jQuery.

For these reasons, the above solution is better than:

<a href="javascript:myClickHandler();">Link Title</a>
<a href="#" onclick="myClickHandler(); return false;">Link Title</a>

where the last solution will avoid the scroll-jump issue if and only if the myClickHandler method doesn't fail.

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Returning false from the code your calling will work and in a number of circumstances is the prefered method but you can also so this

<a href="javascript:;">Link Title</a>

When it comes to SEO it really depends on what your link is going to be used for. If you are going to actually use it to link to some other content then I would agree ideally you would want something meaningful here but if you are using the link for functionality purposes maybe like stackoverflow does for the post toolbar (bold, italic, hyperlink, etc) then it probably doesn't matter.

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If you can simply change the href value, you should use:

<a href="javascript:void(0);">Link Title</a>

Another neat solution I just came up with is to use jQuery to stop the click action from occurring and causing the page to scroll, but only for href="#" links.

<script type="text/javascript">
    /* Stop page jumping when links are pressed */
    $('a[href="#"]').live("click", function(e) {
         return false; // prevent default click action from happening!
         e.preventDefault(); // same thing as above
    });
</script>
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You can simply write like this also:-

<a href="#!" onclick="function()">Delete User</a>
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