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This question is simple but I fail to accurately get a hold of how to do it.

I decided to use WPF, but I don't want to implement some of MVVM pattern in the classic way.

In my project I decided to create my models with INPC and to use them as feed to my XAML as if they were View-Model as well.. so instead of having:
View(<-Binding->)View-Model(<-INPC->)Model

what I designed is:
View(<-Binding->)Model.

The constrain of course is that the model must implement INPC, however compared to classic MVVM in practice - model also need to implement INPC - so I find my this to be perfectly alright as a productive shortcut guided by DRY principle.

I want to support commands as well, I like the concept of commands and I understand how to implement commands when using a view-model. however as I described I decided to skip the view-model.

So providing I have the command written as follows:

public class MyCommand : ICommand
{
    public event EventHandler CanExecuteChanged;

    public void Execute(object parameter)
    {
    //do somthing
    }

    public bool CanExecute(object parameter)
    {
        return true;
    }
}

And that my XAML looks somthing like that:

<UserControl x:Class=... blah blah...
 xmlns:Model="clr-namespace:MyProject.BusinessLogic.Person"
 xmlns:Commands="clr-namespace:MyProject.Commands">

<TextBox Text="{Binding FirstName}" />
<Button Command="What do I put here?" />

<UserControl>

So, what do I put in button command to allow it to invoke MyCommand (which is not in the Model) ?

share|improve this question
1  
Plump a command? Is the terminology getting that weird these days? – siride Apr 15 '13 at 16:10
    
lol, sorry I'll fix it - I meant Plumb :) – G.Y Apr 15 '13 at 16:16
    
This seems quite strange, surely any commanding is related to presentation logic, and a view model is exactly the place to put this logic – devdigital Apr 15 '13 at 16:25
    
@devdigital no no.. - you changing the question there.. assume I do not want a view model - will it be possible to invoke the command from XAML somehow? – G.Y Apr 15 '13 at 16:37
2  
That's what I'm saying, you do want a view model, and that's where your presentation logic should go, including commanding. Your models obviously can't have any reference to ICommand etc. as it sits in a System.Windows.Input namespace, so you need a type that bridges the model with the view, which is the view model. You can expose the model as a property on your view model if you don't wish to follow the pattern entirely and want to avoid delegating all view model calls to the model. – devdigital Apr 15 '13 at 16:41

You might want to read this: http://wpfglue.wordpress.com/2012/05/07/commanding-binding-controls-to-methods/

The idea is to have reusable components which allow to create a CommandBinding which calls a method in the model, and can be configured in XAML. So, the "plumbing" would be done by these components, while the Model would only implement business-related methods.

This can be generalized into something I call a ViewModelKit, i.e. a set of components which can be assembled as resources in XAML and cover common jobs of a ViewModel.

share|improve this answer

You do want a view model, and that's where your presentation logic should go, including commanding.

Your models obviously can't have any reference to ICommand etc. as it sits in a System.Windows.Input namespace, so you need a type that bridges the model with the view, which is the view model.

You can expose the model as a property on your view model if you don't wish to follow the pattern entirely and want to avoid delegating all view model calls to the model.

Another consideration is that if you're doing MVVM then you really should be using an MVVM framework. They will provide an alternative to commanding, which has limitations.

For example, if you wish to re-imagine your UI so that a Button is hidden when it is not enabled, then you can't achieve this easily with commanding.

An MVVM framework such as Caliburn.Micro provides Actions, which provide many benefits over commanding.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually, if you want to hide a disabled button, you can achieve that easily with a trigger depending on IsEnabled=false. In that case it doesn't matter how the button got disabled. – hbarck Apr 15 '13 at 19:53
1  
What if you wanted to keep the button enabled but pop up a dialog when it's clicked to say the action isn't possible? – devdigital Apr 15 '13 at 19:56
    
@devdigital please include the answer from the comment you gave me so I can credit that answer as what really solved my problem. (Include the model as property and expose it in a VM - which eliminated the need to re-declare all properties and normalized the architecture) – G.Y Apr 15 '13 at 20:20
    
@devdigital: cool idea, hadn't thought about that before. Wouldn't know how to do this with a trigger. Probably I'd modify one of the helper components I mentioned in my answer to implement this behaviour. – hbarck Apr 15 '13 at 20:21
    
Answer updated. – devdigital Apr 15 '13 at 20:22

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