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As far as I know, when we run Ruby applications on 64-bit Ruby, it consumes more memory than 32-bit Ruby, this is due to pointer address-space.

My machine has 64GB RAM, so in order to access the full 64GB of memory, I installed a 64-bit OS.

  1. Is it possible to install a 32-bit Ruby on 64-bit OS?
  2. By installing a 32-bit Ruby on 64-bit OS, will my 32-bit Ruby be able to use 64 GB RAM?
  3. What are the pros and cons of running 32-bit Ruby on a 64-bit OS?

I had noticed that running my Ruby on Rails application on 64-bit Ruby consumes more RAM than 32-bit Ruby. I am using Phusion Passenger so it forks or creates new Ruby processes for each request, so each individual Ruby process (user request) is limited to 2 GB in 32-bit Ruby or the overall Ruby process is limited to access only 2GB in 32-bit Ruby.


My Rails application codebase is large and I plan to replicate the same code as multiple Rails applications for multiple clients in a single server so every MB of RAM is important for me, so if more RAM is free I can run additional applications for additional clients.

For more information about the application architecture see "(Using phusion passenger + Nginx) running same rails app with multiple instance names with same port (80)".

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This is much-ado-about-nothing. Most Rails apps run 50 - 150MB per instance, so you'll exhaust your CPU scheduling sooner than the RAM. –  Robert K Apr 15 '13 at 18:32
    
@RobertK My Rails application code base is large and i plan to replicate the same code as multiple rails applications for multiple clients in single server so every MB of RAM is important for me, so if more RAM is free i can run additional application for additional client –  Sam Apr 15 '13 at 18:42

2 Answers 2

  1. Yes, it is possible.
  2. No, it can't access 64 GB RAM. 32-bit processes are limited to 2 GB by default, 3 max if marked LARGE_ADDRESS_AWARE, but not more.
  3. Cons: You're limited to 2 GB of memory.

You're worrying about nothing, though. The pointer sizes going from 32-bit (4 bytes) to 64-bits (8 bytes) only affects the pointers. If you have 64 GB of RAM and a 64-bit processor that can use them, use the 64-bit version.

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I had noticed while, running my ruby on rails application on 64 bit ruby consumes more RAM than 32 bit ruby and I am using phusion passenger so it forks or create new ruby process for each request , so each individual ruby process (ie. user request) is limited to 2 GB in 32 bit ruby or over all ruby process is limited to access only 2GB in 32 bit ruby. –  Sam Apr 15 '13 at 18:27
    
Perhaps this question can help. –  Ken White Apr 15 '13 at 18:34

...I plan to replicate the same code as multiple Rails applications for multiple clients in a single server so every MB of RAM is important for me...

Don't write monolithic applications, write smaller Rails apps that call central code that handles as much processing as possible for all apps calling it. It'd be a tiny bit slower, but much more efficient memory-wise.

Look into something like RabbitMQ as the backend. It's amazingly efficient and great for this sort of task. The AMQP gem is your friend.

Throw your data around the queues using JSON. It makes it easy to debug.

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I have updated my post with application architecture, can you please check it out –  Sam Apr 16 '13 at 10:11
    
You say your code base is "large", but that tells us nothing. A large number of lines? Requires a large amount of RAM for processing? Quote hard facts so there is something useful to work with. If you are using a lot of RAM, figure out how to share code, which is what a MQ is for and store data in fast DB tables. –  the Tin Man Apr 16 '13 at 13:09
    
Thanks for your reply, note: the discussion is between 32 bit ruby and 64 bit ruby –  Sam Apr 16 '13 at 16:54
    
The discussion is "My Rails application code base is large and i plan to replicate the same code as multiple rails applications for multiple clients in single server so every MB of RAM is important for me, so if more RAM is free i can run additional application for additional client" Write your system right and you can fit in a huge amount of processing. I can't say more, but you'd be surprised what we squeeze into tiny VMs this way. –  the Tin Man Apr 16 '13 at 16:56
    
@theTinMan Prescribing the OP to use message queues and Service Oriented Architecture is completely irrelevant to the question at hand. The question is about computing architecture and address space sizes. –  richoffrails Jan 6 at 17:30

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