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Nomaly I used to build a singleton the following recipe:

+ (MyClass *)sharedInstance 
{       
    static MyClass *_sharedInstance = nil;
    static dispatch_once_t oncePredicate;

    dispatch_once(&oncePredicate, ^{
        _sharedInstance = [[self alloc] init];
        // Init variables
    });

    return _sharedInstance;
}

Then I can call methods as following:

[[MyClass sharedInstance] anyInstanceMethod];

But, what happen when any init variables are configurables from outside the class? My approach is create two class methods, one of them with configurables variables:

+ (MyClass *)sharedInstanceWithVariableOne:(NSString*)aParamOne andVariableTwo:(NSString*)aParamTwo 
{       
    static MyClass *_sharedInstance = nil;
    static dispatch_once_t oncePredicate;

    dispatch_once(&oncePredicate, ^{
        _sharedInstance = [[self alloc] init];

        // Init configurables variables
        _sharedInstance.paramOne = aParamOne;
        _sharedInstance.paramTwo = aParamTwo;
    });

    return _sharedInstance;
}

And the second one as proxy to this last one with default values:

   + (MyClass *)sharedInstance
    {       
        return [MyClass sharedInstanceWithVariableOne:@"value1" andVariableTwo:@"value2"];
    }

So, if you want to use singleton class with configure variables, you should call first of all sharedInstanceWithVariableOne:andVariableTwo and then only sharedInstance. I think this approach is not the best and I'm looking forward to use others.

Thanks in advance.

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Why you dont like this? –  Anoop Vaidya Apr 15 '13 at 18:09
5  
I find this pattern a bit fishy. Consider what happens when calling sharedInstanceWithVariableOne:... multiple times. Only the first set of parameters would have any effect, the other ones would get the same shared instance, but not with the expected parameters. Either each configuration should be a separate object, or these parameters should be properties of the shared instance that are just set whenever you need to change them. –  omz Apr 15 '13 at 18:14
    
Anoop Vaidya, I think that could exist a better approach. This one could be confused and not obvious for use. –  martinezdelariva Apr 15 '13 at 18:14
4  
What you are creating here is not a singleton. Do you want a singleton, or do you want a class that caches instances based on their initialization parameters? Those aren't the same thing, and I think confusing them is what's throwing you off. –  Chuck Apr 15 '13 at 18:22
1  
Yes, I agree with @Chuck. It isn't any client's job to configure a singleton once and for all. Look at how UIApplication sharedApplication works: there is only one way to get it, and anyone can then send it messages. If you want a global method that creates and vends an object configured in accordance with the client's request, like UIFont fontWithName:, then do that, but don't call it a singleton. –  matt Apr 15 '13 at 18:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Thanks for your fast responses. As you says, it's not a singleton. I'm going to use the same behaviour as [NSURLCache setSharedURLCache:]and [NSURLCache sharedURLCache].

Interface

// MyClass.h
@interface MyClass : NSObject

+ (MyClass *)sharedMyClass;
+ (void)setSharedMyClass:(MyClass *)object;

- (id)initWithParamOne:(NSString)p1 andParamTwo:(NSString)p2;
@end

Implementation

// MyClass.m
@interface MyClass ()
@property(nonatomic, strong) NSString *paramOne;
@property(nonatomic, strong) NSString *paramTwo;
@end;

@implementation MyClass

static MyClass *_sharedInstance = nil;

+ (MyClass *)sharedMyClass
{
    if (_sharedInstance == nil) {
        _sharedInstance = [[MyClass alloc] initWithParamOne:@"value1" andParamTwo:@"value2"];
    }

    return _sharedInstance ;
}

+ (void)setSharedMyClass:(MyClass *)object
{
    _sharedInstance = object;
}

- (id)initWithParamOne:(NSString)p1 andParamTwo:(NSString)p2
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self) {
        _paramOne = p1;
        _paramTwo = p2;
    }

    return self;
}

Then I could use [[MyClass sharedMyClass] anyMethod]

share|improve this answer

There are many ways to design what you are after with your shared instance. (It is not a singleton as many comments point out, for that there must be only one instance of the class possible. However that said the shared instance pattern is often used as a "poor man's" singleton with no direct calls to any init methods. Back to the question...) Maybe the following will suit you:

+ (void) setSharedInstanceParameterOne:(NSString*)aParamOne
                       andParameterTwo:(NSString*)aParamTwo 
{       
   MyClass *_sharedInstance = self.sharedInstance;
   _sharedInstance.paramOne = aParamOne;
   _sharedInstance.paramTwo = aParamTwo;
}

Now you use [MyClass setSharedInstanceParameterOne:p1 andParameterTwo:p2] to set/change the parameters of the shared instance, and [MyClass sharedInstance] (or MyClass.sharedInstance, though some might have a philosophical discussion about that) to access it.

share|improve this answer
    
Could you elaborate on this pattern ? I can't get it to work. –  kursus Mar 14 at 15:37
    
@kursus - What doesn't work for you? You have two methods, one to obtain the shared instance (e.g. the OP's first method) and a convenience one to change its configuration (the method above). –  CRD Mar 14 at 16:51

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