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Edit 2.

Thanks to Ken this is now working. And I even think I understand why :-)

Here's the amended line:

- (void) reCreatePath {
    CGMutablePathRef p = ::CGPathCreateMutable() ;

    ::CGPathMoveToPoint         (p, 0, TL.x, TL.y) ;
    // [snip]
    ::CGPathAddLineToPoint      (p, 0, BL.x, BL.y) ;
    ::CGPathCloseSubpath(p) ;


    self.path = p ;
    ::CGPathRelease(p) ;   // <<== THIS IS IT!! :-)
}

Edit.

I still don't get it. I tried Chuck suggestion:

@property (nonatomic, strong) __attribute__((NSObject)) CGPathRef  path ;

Like so:

@interface TopLeftSlidingView  ()

@property (nonatomic, strong) __attribute__((NSObject)) CGPathRef  path ;

@end

And at the point where I recreate the CGPath:

- (void) reCreatePath {
    CGMutablePathRef p = ::CGPathCreateMutable() ;

    ::CGPathMoveToPoint         (p, 0, TL.x, TL.y) ;
    // [snip]
    ::CGPathAddLineToPoint      (p, 0, BL.x, BL.y) ;
    ::CGPathCloseSubpath(p) ;


//    self.path = (__bridge CGMutablePathRef) p ;
//    self.path = (__bridge_transfer CGMutablePathRef) p ;
//    self.path = (__bridge_retained CGMutablePathRef) p ;
    self.path = p ;
}

Either of the three commented out lines results in a compiler error. The non commented line does compile, but generates an analyser warning:

/Users/verec/Projects/WordGame/WordGame/classes/TopLeftSlidingView.mm:211:26:
 Call to function 'CGPathCreateMutable' returns a Core Foundation object with
 a +1 retain count

followed by:

/Users/verec/Projects/WordGame/WordGame/classes/TopLeftSlidingView.mm:225:5:
 Object leaked: object allocated and stored into 'p' is not referenced later 
 in this execution path and has a retain count of +1

I just do not get it :(


Consider:

@interface Test : NSObject

@property (nonatomic, assign) CGColorRef color ;

@end

@implementation Test

- (void) dealloc {
    if (self.color) {
        ::CGColorRelease(self.color) ;
        self.color = 0 ;
    }
}

- (id) init {
    if (self = [super init]) {
        self.color = ::CGColorRetain([UIColor blueColor].CGColor) ;
    }
    return self ;
}

@end

This all compiles (and seemingly runs) fine except that the analyser keeps reporting warnings.

In essence what this code is saying is: "Please ARC, don't bother doing anything at all with color, please treat it the way you'd treat any other assign property, be it an BOOL or CGFloat, I'm handling memory management all by my own!"

Except that ARC refuses to listen to me and still complains!

I have read many questions here on SO, but none of them seem to address this issue ...

The key thing here, and the compiler (though not the analyser) seems to agree, is that by declaring the property `assign' I have claimed to handle it all on my own...

So I must be wrong, but I just don't see why ...

What's wrong?

share|improve this question
1  
if you want to manage everything by yours, then certainly you dont need property, you can go with ivar and create setters and getters. –  Anoop Vaidya Apr 15 '13 at 18:19
    
I'm kind of feeling like the analyzer has a point here. Do you have accessors for color? –  Chuck Apr 15 '13 at 18:27
    
@ anoop Such a good answer! You should make it a proper reply so that I can accept it! :-) @ chuck as soon as you declare a property Xcode now synthesises the getters/setters for you. Maybe I could add a @dynamic? But why does ARC bother with assign properties at all? –  verec Apr 15 '13 at 18:27
    
@verec: Chuck is always good. –  Anoop Vaidya Apr 15 '13 at 18:29
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1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If you're using the automatically synthesized getters and setters, there is indeed a memory management problem here. In the setter, your CGColor needs to be released and the new value retained, but the assign accessor will not do this for you — it literally just assigns the new pointer value to the variable. You'll need to implement your own accessors in order to manage the memory correctly.

However, if you'd like, ARC can handle this for you instead of you having to do it yourself. Just declare it like so:

@property(nonatomic, strong) __attribute__((NSObject)) CGColorRef color;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the attribute ((NSObject)) in case I'd want ARC to manage it for me, but I still do not understand why the setter of an assign property could legitimately do anything at all regarding memory management. Does ARC inspect every single assign property for CF data types? And just gives up when it sees a scalar? What's the point? –  verec Apr 15 '13 at 19:01
1  
I think it is the static analyzer. In self.color = CGColorRetain(..), which is the same as [self setColor:CGColorRetain(..)], it does not know that the retain is balanced later in dealloc. –  Martin R Apr 15 '13 at 19:04
    
I think I get it now. The thing is that because it is a property, it could be used by KVO by someone outside my implementation, that would have no idea that the thing needs special care (and wouldn't be able to provide it if they did). Hence making it a property-less ivar as @anoop suggested is probably the safest bet. Thank you all for clarifying this! :) –  verec Apr 15 '13 at 19:09
1  
@MartinR: __attribute__((NSObject)) works for all CoreFoundation objects. For example, it's used with a number of non-bridged types in Apple's AVFoundation framework (e.g. CMClock). At any rate, if you're going to do the management yourself, the correct semantics for using a setter would be to have the memory management in the setter. Do you think I should be clearer about that? –  Chuck Apr 15 '13 at 19:41
2  
You are still responsible for correct local memory management. In this case, you have to CGPathRelease(p); after assigning to the property. The property is properly memory-managed but that doesn't take care of the local. –  Ken Thomases Apr 17 '13 at 17:19
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