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I am using temporal difference learning to train computer at playing go. I have noticed that my agent is really slow playing 1 game (like 10 seconds) when it should be able to play 100.000 games in about 20 minutes. After narrowing down the problem I have found out that line no. 5 in the following code is the troublemaker. The code is taken from a much larger function.

int i;
 double td = newValue - oldValueWhite;
 for(i = 0; i<FEATURES_SIZE; i++)
 {
     Value[i] =Value[i] + alpha*(td)*((double)phiOldWhite[i]);
 }

However, the following code runs smooth as hell:

 double tmp:
 int i;
 double td = newValue - oldValueWhite;
 for(i = 0; i<FEATURES_SIZE; i++)
 {
     tmp =Value[i] + alpha*(td)*((double)phiOldWhite[i]);
 }

I am not sure if it is the compiler just ignoring the calculations or if the assigning of new value to Value[i] is really slow. Worth mentioning, Value is taken in as pointer to the function.

Any ideas?

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2 Answers 2

If tmp is not used after your for loop, your compiler may simply optimize out the for loop.

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In case you are using C99, you can try the following (or use gcc extensions __restrict__):

int i;
double restrict *Value = ...;        // tell compiler Value and phiOldWhite are 
double restrict *phiOldWhite = ...;  // different memory areas

double td = (newValue - oldValueWhite) * td;
for (i = 0; i < FEATURES_SIZE; i++)
{
    Value[i] += td * phiOldWhite[i];
}

I used type double for phiOldWhite, but you can use your's type.

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