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If this is a duplicate, just tell me what this is a duplicate of. How would I make a js closure reused in multiple functions? It seems I can't figure it out, I might be missing something, but I either have to keep reimplementing inner function (to create closure), or put the function outside (but then, it's not closure anymore). How do I do both at the same time?

Example: So a js closure is create like this:

function a()
{
    var x = "99";
    var b = function()
    {
       //x=99
    }
}

function z()
{
    var x = "99";
    var b = function()
    {
       //x=99
    }
}

HOWEVER, this is NOT closure:

function bTemplate()
{
   //when coming from call of b() in m, x will not be the x from function m!
}
function m()
{
    var x = "99";
    var b = bTemplate;
    b(); //x is not the x from function m
}
function n()
{
    var x = "98";
    var b = bTemplate;
    b(); //x is not the x from function m
}

My question is: *how to define a function from outside (to avoid repetition), AND at the same time create a closure so arguments don't have to be passed in? Maybe it's something really obvious but for some reason, cant figure it out. *

For example above, if m and n are slightly different wrapper functions, how to capture the state of both without having bTemplate implemented as inner functions in both?

Thanks!

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It depends on why you think it needs to be a closure. What state do you want to capture? –  Paul Grime Apr 15 '13 at 21:35
    
The 2nd one has a closure. But b() isn't in it. –  Lee Meador Apr 15 '13 at 21:36
    
Suppose b is a function that will be the same, but it is to be reused in multiple "outside" function which are slightly different yet the state of those are desired to be captured and passed to b. Any way that b doesn't have to be redefined every single time? I edited question –  mathtutor Apr 15 '13 at 21:38
    
Why don't you just move the declaration of x to the outer scope? –  bfavaretto Apr 15 '13 at 21:53
1  
You could put all the stuff in one object and pass in the one object. That's pretty easy. –  Lee Meador Apr 15 '13 at 22:08
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8 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could exploit the this argument that is implicitly passed to functions. But again, it is still "passing" something, even though it's not explicitly declared as a parameter.

function bTemplate()
{
   // here use this.x
}
function m()
{
    this.x = "99";
    bTemplate.call(this);
}
function n()
{
    this.x = "98";
    bTemplate.call(this);
}
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Here is one potential approach:

function make_b(x) {
    var b = function() {
        //x come from argument to make_b
    };
    return b;
}

function a() {
    var x = "99";
    var b = make_b(x);
}

function z() {
    var x = "99";
    var b = make_b(x);
}

This allows you to define the function b in only one place, and in both a and z the value of x is accessed in without being passed into b by using a closure. I think this fits your requirements, although it is still a little unclear why you don't want to just pass x into b.

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Could you solve your problem by doing:

function cl() {
    var x = 99;

    var funcs = {};
    funcs.a = function() {
        return x;
    }

    funcs.b = function() {
        return 2*x;
    }
    return funcs;
}

theFuncs = cl();

theFuncs.a();
theFuncs.b();
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You are completely missing the point of lexical scoping.

In your example, functions a and b belong in the same scope, therefore each should have an inner scope chain completely invisible to the other. The way you are trying to do it violates how JavaScript interpreter works and therefore is impossible without inventing your own DSL or something.

You should use your second example.

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add comment
function Wrapper(){
    var x = "99";
    this.bTemplate = function()
    {
       //has access now to x because x is closed over by wrapper function 
    }

    this.m = function()
    {
        var b = bTemplate;
        b(); //x is now the same x as m because it is declared in Wrapper
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
I appreciate response Paul! yes, I know I can pass it in. But the problem is, I don't want to pass it in! Instead I want to capture outer function lexical environment. At same time, I dont want to redefine bTemplate in multiple functions either (i.e. suppose bTemplate is the same that wants to capture slight variations in multiple outer functions) If I pass it in, it's not a closure and I always have to worry about passing in the whole environment each time! I want to know some way i can do both (closure + outside). I think there is a way but it eludes me. –  mathtutor Apr 15 '13 at 21:41
    
oh then you have to write a function wrapping both functions –  Paul Sullivan Apr 15 '13 at 21:42
    
bear with me I'll re-write –  Paul Sullivan Apr 15 '13 at 21:42
    
Im not sure I follow you completely... can ou give a more concrete case –  Paul Sullivan Apr 15 '13 at 21:48
add comment

You can't. This is the gist of lexical scoping -- use of a variable refers to the variable defined in a lexically enclosing scope, i.e. a scope that physically surrounds it in the source code. Thus you can determine the variable that is referred to solely by looking at the source code.

Thus if you want to use the variable x in the function, it must either be a parameter or local variable, or it must be defined in a lexically surrounding scope.

If you want to be able to refer to variables in the calling scope, that is called dynamic scoping. Dynamic scoping is interesting, but not intuitive. There were historically some languages that used dynamic scoping. No language in common use today uses dynamic scoping (Perl can be made to do dynamic scoping, but by default it is still lexical scoping).

share|improve this answer
    
I think you describe it correctly. It's what i thought a closure was at first, so you're saying there isn't more to them than I thought there was. "a scope that physically surrounds it in the source code" seems to be a way of saying "inner function". So closures == "inner function" right? Which means an inner function must be actually implemented somewhere INSIDE an outer function for the outer function to close over it. So I can't do what I am asking in JS, because that would be "dynamic scoping", and by definition lexical scope means the function has to be an inner function, right? –  mathtutor Apr 16 '13 at 9:35
    
I guess that's what i thought it was. I suppose a simpler way to reword my question would be "are closures anything more than inner functions, or is there something about inner functions that could allow for me to use them 'outside' another function" and the answer would be 'no' I suppose, right? –  mathtutor Apr 16 '13 at 9:37
    
@mathtutor: yes, a closure is by definition a function that captures variables from a surrounding scope, so must be an inner function. And yes, closures only makes sense in a lexical scoping language. In a dynamic scoping language, functions don't use variables from the surrounding scope, variables come instead from the calling environment, so there are no closures in a dynamic scoping language. –  newacct Apr 16 '13 at 19:53
add comment

I think that you all are right, I can't do both at the same time. I have to either redefine it, or pass it. I guess nothing stops me from making sure the inner functions have variables defined as properties of themselves, then passing that inner function itself to the outer template function via function call, then having the environment captured that way, if I really wanted to have multiple inner functions pass themselves to an outer, and that's probably the only way isn't it? I think I get it now. Thanks!

Example: http://jsfiddle.net/BY3Kc/3/

HTML:

<div id="a"></div>

CSS:

$("#a").css({"width":500,"height":500,"border":"3px solid"});

function outsider(obj,cb)
{
    console.log(obj.o);
    cb();
}

$("#a").on("click",function(){
   var that = arguments.callee;
    that.o = "a";
    outsider(that,function(){console.log("done")});

});

$("#a").on("dblclick",function(){
   var that = arguments.callee;
    that.o = "b";
    outsider(that,function(){console.log("done2")});

});
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Two possible solutions.

One. Use the controversial eval().

function changeX() {
  x += 40;
  console.log(x);
}

function a() {
  var x = 7;
  eval(changeX.toString());
  changeX();
}

Two. Drop the love affair with closures. Just use "normal" objects in whatever flavor you prefer.

function Closure() {
  this.changeX = function() {
    this.x += 40;
    console.log(this.x);
  }
}

function a() {
  Closure.apply(this);
  this.x = 1;
  this.changeX();
}

function b() {
  Closure.apply(this);
  this.x = 2;
  this.changeX();
}

function c() {
  this.x = 3;
  this.changeX();
}
c.prototype = new Closure();

... or however you prefer to build your objects.

Bear in mind, the only distinction between a "normal" object and a closure, at least as it pertains to your question, is the presence of absence of this. in front of your variables.

I'd personally suggest approach two: Just build objects and accustom yourself to typing this. and that.. eval() gets the job done, but it's controversial and unnecessary.

share|improve this answer
    
no offense... eval must (and should) die –  Paul Sullivan Apr 15 '13 at 22:03
    
@PaulSullivan I can understand the sentiment. And it's use should certainly be a rarity. But, it's not entirely without practical (and safe) use. –  svidgen Apr 15 '13 at 22:04
    
on a side note... I like this answer. From what I can see .apply changes the scope of this to be the calling functions scope... nice. –  Paul Sullivan Apr 15 '13 at 22:06
    
@PaulSullivan I've edited my opinion on the matter into my answer. Hopefully it's less offensive to you now. –  svidgen Apr 15 '13 at 22:07
    
;) function a() { Closure.apply(this); //switch to Closre scope this.x = 1; //x becomes 1 this.changeX(); //41 (I would of liked 42 better but hey I'm splitting hairs) } –  Paul Sullivan Apr 15 '13 at 22:08
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