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I'm using the feedwordpress WordPress plugin.

It uses queries which are VERY heavy on my server, and I'm not sure how (or if) they can be improved. Bellow is the output I got from my hosting company, is there any hope in improving this?

(sorry for not being more specific with the question, but I'm not sure how to - feel free to edit the question in order to improve it - thanks!)

most memory usage likely comes from the MySQL service:
Uptime: 3 hours 32 min 48 sec

Threads: 4 Questions: 761936 Slow queries: 254 Opens: 610 Flush tables: 1 Open tables: 603 Queries per second avg: 59.675

It is up 3 and a half hour and already had more than 250 slow queries, I will list the last few queries, and once you manage to optimize these I'm sure the memory usage will decrease as well:
# User@Host: rblogger_rblogr[rblogger_rblogr] @ localhost []
# Thread_id: 5737 Schema: rblogger_rblog Last_errno: 0 Killed: 0
# Query_time: 11.448474 Lock_time: 0.000059 Rows_sent: 0 Rows_examined: 66004 Rows_affected: 0 Rows_read: 66004
# Bytes_sent: 89 Tmp_tables: 0 Tmp_disk_tables: 0 Tmp_table_sizes: 0
# InnoDB_trx_id: 25335B6
SET timestamp=1366020031;
SELECT ID FROM wp_rb_posts WHERE to_ping <> '' AND post_status = 'publish';
# Time: 130415 5:01:01
# User@Host: rblogger_rblogr[rblogger_rblogr] @ localhost []
# Thread_id: 5785 Schema: rblogger_rblog Last_errno: 0 Killed: 0
# Query_time: 4.344107 Lock_time: 0.000129 Rows_sent: 2219 Rows_examined: 13192 Rows_affected: 0 Rows_read: 13192
# Bytes_sent: 23262206 Tmp_tables: 0 Tmp_disk_tables: 0 Tmp_table_sizes: 0
# InnoDB_trx_id: 25335D9
SET timestamp=1366020061;
SELECT wp_rb_posts.* FROM wp_rb_posts WHERE 1=1 AND (((wp_rb_posts.post_title LIKE '%git%') OR (wp_rb_posts.post_content LIKE '%git%'))) AND (wp_rb_posts.post_password = '') AND wp_rb_posts.post_type IN ('post', 'page', 'attachment') AND (wp_rb_posts.post_status = 'publish') ORDER BY wp_rb_posts.post_date DESC;
# Time: 130415 6:03:28
# User@Host: rblogger_rblogr[rblogger_rblogr] @ localhost []
# Thread_id: 8619 Schema: rblogger_rblog Last_errno: 0 Killed: 0
# Query_time: 7.299722 Lock_time: 0.000092 Rows_sent: 0 Rows_examined: 66005 Rows_affected: 0 Rows_read: 66005
# Bytes_sent: 89 Tmp_tables: 0 Tmp_disk_tables: 0 Tmp_table_sizes: 0
# InnoDB_trx_id: 2534534
SET timestamp=1366023808;
SELECT ID FROM wp_rb_posts WHERE to_ping <> '' AND post_status = 'publish';
# User@Host: rblogger_rblogr[rblogger_rblogr] @ localhost []
# Thread_id: 8620 Schema: rblogger_rblog Last_errno: 0 Killed: 0
# Query_time: 9.666021 Lock_time: 0.000037 Rows_sent: 0 Rows_examined: 66005 Rows_affected: 0 Rows_read: 66005
# Bytes_sent: 89 Tmp_tables: 0 Tmp_disk_tables: 0 Tmp_table_sizes: 0
# InnoDB_trx_id: 2534533
SET timestamp=1366023808;
SELECT ID FROM wp_rb_posts WHERE to_ping <> '' AND post_status = 'publish';
# Time: 130415 6:58:25
# User@Host: rblogger_rblogr[rblogger_rblogr] @ localhost []
# Thread_id: 11340 Schema: rblogger_rblog Last_errno: 0 Killed: 0
# Query_time: 4.616263 Lock_time: 0.000067 Rows_sent: 10 Rows_examined: 6014 Rows_affected: 0 Rows_read: 6014
# Bytes_sent: 189 Tmp_tables: 0 Tmp_disk_tables: 0 Tmp_table_sizes: 0
# InnoDB_trx_id: 253530A
SET timestamp=1366027105;
SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS wp_rb_posts.ID FROM wp_rb_posts WHERE 1=1 AND (wp_rb_posts.post_author = 56) AND wp_rb_posts.post_type = 'post' AND (wp_rb_posts.post_status = 'publish') ORDER BY wp_rb_posts.post_date DESC LIMIT 0, 10;

Here is the result for SHOW CREATE TABLE wp_rb_posts:

CREATE TABLE `wp_rb_posts` (
 `ID` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
 `post_author` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
 `post_date` datetime NOT NULL DEFAULT '0000-00-00 00:00:00',
 `post_date_gmt` datetime NOT NULL DEFAULT '0000-00-00 00:00:00',
 `post_content` longtext NOT NULL,
 `post_title` text NOT NULL,
 `post_excerpt` text NOT NULL,
 `post_status` varchar(20) NOT NULL DEFAULT 'publish',
 `comment_status` varchar(20) NOT NULL DEFAULT 'open',
 `ping_status` varchar(20) NOT NULL DEFAULT 'open',
 `post_password` varchar(20) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
 `post_name` varchar(200) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
 `to_ping` text NOT NULL,
 `pinged` text NOT NULL,
 `post_modified` datetime NOT NULL DEFAULT '0000-00-00 00:00:00',
 `post_modified_gmt` datetime NOT NULL DEFAULT '0000-00-00 00:00:00',
 `post_content_filtered` longtext NOT NULL,
 `post_parent` bigint(20) unsigned NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
 `guid` varchar(255) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
 `menu_order` int(11) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
 `post_type` varchar(20) NOT NULL DEFAULT 'post',
 `post_mime_type` varchar(100) NOT NULL DEFAULT '',
 `comment_count` bigint(20) NOT NULL DEFAULT '0',
 PRIMARY KEY (`ID`),
 KEY `post_name` (`post_name`),
 KEY `type_status_date` (`post_type`,`post_status`,`post_date`,`ID`),
 KEY `post_parent` (`post_parent`),
 KEY `wp_rb_posts_guid_idx` (`guid`),
 KEY `post_author` (`post_author`),
 KEY `guid` (`guid`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=69681 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8

The next diagnostic run was:

EXPLAIN SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS wp_rb_posts.ID
FROM wp_rb_posts
WHERE 1 =1
AND (
wp_rb_posts.post_author =56
)
AND wp_rb_posts.post_type =  'post'
AND (
wp_rb_posts.post_status =  'publish'
)
ORDER BY wp_rb_posts.post_date DESC 
LIMIT 0 , 10

With the following output:

id  select_type table   type    possible_keys   key key_len ref rows    Extra
1   SIMPLE  wp_rb_posts ref type_status_date,post_author    post_author 8   const   5624    Using where; Using filesort
share|improve this question
2  
You need to show us the table and index definitions. Diagnosing slow queries requires full table and index definitions, not just a description or paraphrase. Maybe your tables are defined poorly. Maybe the indexes aren't created correctly. Maybe you don't have an index on that column you thought you did. Without seeing the table and index definitions, we can't tell. If you know how to do an EXPLAIN or get an execution plan, put the results in the question as well. –  Andy Lester Apr 15 '13 at 21:51
    
Hi Andy - could you write me a query to run? I'd be happy to update the question. –  Tal Galili Apr 15 '13 at 22:09
    
@TalGalili: Just prefix EXPLAIN to those queries. For the table definition, use SHOW CREATE TABLE .... –  Alix Axel Apr 15 '13 at 22:10
1  
Thanks @AlixAxel I've updated the question with SHOW (etc.) and EXPLAIN. I hope this helps. –  Tal Galili Apr 15 '13 at 22:17
1  
Just letting @AndyLester know about it. –  Alix Axel Apr 15 '13 at 23:02

3 Answers 3

Firstly, have a look at this thread on the support forum (I see you posted for help there too) - you're not the only one with problems, and there are a couple of suggestions in this thread.

Secondly, working with a remotely hosted database to debug performance problems is a horrible game - especially if this is your live server. For your own sanity, I'd strongly recommend recreating the system on a machine you can actually work on and experiment with.

The very least you probably need is to get MySQL running (ideally in the same version as your server), and restore the database from your live environment.

Next, take the slow running queries, and work out what is going on - as far as I can tell, your worst offenders have no matching indices.

SELECT ID FROM wp_rb_posts WHERE to_ping <> '' AND post_status = 'publish';

would benefit from a compound index on to_ping and possibly post_status (the cardinality of that column may be too low to help much).

SELECT SQL_CALC_FOUND_ROWS wp_rb_posts.ID
FROM wp_rb_posts
WHERE 1 =1
AND (
wp_rb_posts.post_author =56
)
AND wp_rb_posts.post_type =  'post'
AND (
wp_rb_posts.post_status =  'publish'
)
ORDER BY wp_rb_posts.post_date DESC 
LIMIT 0 , 10

looks like it has low cardinality across most of the columns too - but if you have a lot of rows, selecting the top 10 based on post_date is going to be expensive; consider a compound index on all columns in the where clause, plus post_date.

SELECT wp_rb_posts.* 
FROM wp_rb_posts 
WHERE 1=1 
AND (
     (
      (wp_rb_posts.post_title LIKE '%git%') 
     OR 
      (wp_rb_posts.post_content LIKE '%git%')
     )
    ) 
AND (wp_rb_posts.post_password = '') 
AND wp_rb_posts.post_type IN ('post', 'page', 'attachment') 
AND (wp_rb_posts.post_status = 'publish') 
ORDER BY wp_rb_posts.post_date DESC;

is just nasty - the text search should really use freetext searching; this is likely to be very slow for a large data set. If you can't change that query, not sure what you can do to fix it - you could add a compound key on the other columns, but it looks to me like that query searches for the text in all current posts.

Create the indices on your local machine, measure if they make any difference, and ideally test that you haven't broken anything (e.g. by adding a unique index by accident...).

share|improve this answer
SELECT wp_rb_posts.* FROM wp_rb_posts WHERE 1=1 AND (((wp_rb_posts.post_title LIKE '%git%') OR (wp_rb_posts.post_content LIKE '%git%'))) AND (wp_rb_posts.post_password = '') AND wp_rb_posts.post_type IN ('post', 'page', 'attachment') AND (wp_rb_posts.post_status = 'publish') ORDER BY wp_rb_posts.post_date DESC;

As for one, I'm sure that one problem is the % wildcard, being used before and after a literal, i.e. the Contains string operation. For example, a much faster query would be the LIKE 'git%' - StartsWith operation. As for other queries, it is very important that you post how your indexes are defined in the tables.

As an example of what I would do in certain situations to solve the %git% problem is that I would create a trigger (I work with MSSQL) which on insert/update operation would calculate if there is the 'git' string contained in both the title and the content of the record and mark a bit field as (true) if so. This would slow down the insert/update operation on the table (insignificantly when inserting or updating only one record at a time), but it would greatly increase the performance of the search query.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think "git" is a meaningful part of the data model - I think that query was in response to a search for blog posts on "git". –  Neville K Apr 15 '13 at 22:25
    
@NevilleK - I think you are correct. –  Tal Galili Apr 15 '13 at 22:31
    
Yep, me too. :) However, I still think that the Contains operation should be avoided. –  Zoran Causev Apr 15 '13 at 23:24
    
Indeed - but it makes the "update a bit flag on insert" strategy a little awkward... –  Neville K Apr 16 '13 at 9:46
    
The "update a bit flat on insert" strategy was for the specific situation. If there is a case where filtering is always done on a specific string, then I think it's not a bad solution - it's a trade - you slow down the update/insert and gain performance on select queries. But again, in this case, this is not useful. I agree with you that the best solution would be to use freetext searching. –  Zoran Causev Apr 16 '13 at 10:52

There are several packages for Linux that can help you diagnose and tune your MySQL server, namely:

  • innotop
  • mysqltuner
  • tuning-primer
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. Sadly, I'm using a managed VPS - so I can't check it using these tools. –  Tal Galili Apr 15 '13 at 22:08

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