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I'm trying to make a method that converts an integer that represents bytes to a string with a 'prettied up' format.

Here's my half-working attempt:

class Integer
  def to_filesize
    {
      'B'  => 1024,
      'KB' => 1024 * 1024,
      'MB' => 1024 * 1024 * 1024,
      'GB' => 1024 * 1024 * 1024 * 1024,
      'TB' => 1024 * 1024 * 1024 * 1024 * 1024
    }.each_pair { |e, s| return "#{s / self}#{e}" if self < s }
  end
end

What am I doing wrong?

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4 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

How about the Filesize gem ? It seems to be able to convert from bytes (and other formats) into pretty printed values:

example:

Filesize.from("12502343 B").pretty      # => "11.92 MiB"

http://rubygems.org/gems/filesize

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I think the gem location should be here http://rubygems.org/gems/filesize –  Indika Dec 17 '13 at 10:49
    
Updated the gem location. –  David P Feb 25 at 19:03
    
Soooo many gems :) Thanks for this. Really handy! –  Steve Robinson Mar 27 at 11:27
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I agree with @David that it's probably best to use an existing solution, but to answer your question about what you're doing wrong:

  1. The primary error is dividing s by self rather than the other way around.
  2. You really want to divide by the previous s, so divide s by 1024.
  3. Doing integer arithmetic will give you confusing results, so convert to float.
  4. Perhaps round the answer.

So:

class Integer
  def to_filesize
    {
      'B'  => 1024,
      'KB' => 1024 * 1024,
      'MB' => 1024 * 1024 * 1024,
      'GB' => 1024 * 1024 * 1024 * 1024,
      'TB' => 1024 * 1024 * 1024 * 1024 * 1024
    }.each_pair { |e, s| return "#{(self.to_f / (s / 1024)).round(2)}#{e}" if self < s }
  end
end

lets you:

1.to_filesize
# => "1.0B"
1020.to_filesize
# => "1020.0B" 
1024.to_filesize
# => "1.0KB" 
1048576.to_filesize
# => "1.0MB"

Again, I don't recommend actually doing that, but it seems worth correcting the bugs.

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Thanks a bunch. I see what I was doing wrong. (I can be an idiot) –  TeamBlast Apr 15 '13 at 23:36
    
You're very welcome. If bugs are evidence of idiocy, then we're all guilty of it. It was a fine start. –  Darshan-Josiah Barber Apr 15 '13 at 23:38
    
This is awesome. I rather use this instead of the gem. –  Sheharyar Dec 5 '13 at 15:37
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If you use it with Rails - what about standard Rails number helper?

http://api.rubyonrails.org/classes/ActionView/Helpers/NumberHelper.html#method-i-number_to_human_size

number_to_human_size(number, options = {})

?

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@Darshan Computing's solution is only partial here. Since the hash keys are not guaranteed to be ordered this approach will not work reliably. You could fix this by doing something like this inside the to_filesize method,

 conv={
      1024=>'B',
      1024*1024=>'KB',
      ...
 }
 conv.keys.sort.each { |s|
     next if self >= s
     e=conv[s]
     return "#{(self.to_f / (s / 1024)).round(2)}#{e}" if self < s }
 }

This is what I ended up doing for a similar method inside Float,

 class Float
   def to_human
     conv={
       1024=>'B',
       1024*1024=>'KB',
       1024*1024*1024=>'MB',
       1024*1024*1024*1024=>'GB',
       1024*1024*1024*1024*1024=>'TB',
       1024*1024*1024*1024*1024*1024=>'PB',
       1024*1024*1024*1024*1024*1024*1024=>'EB'
     }
     conv.keys.sort.each { |mult|
        next if self >= mult
        suffix=conv[mult]
        return "%.2f %s" % [ self / (mult / 1024), suffix ]
     }
   end
 end
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