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So, I want to ask the user to type a word and then, the program will reverse it. This is my code, but it doesn't properly run. What's wrong?

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

char anadr(int, int, char pin[]);

main()
{
      char pin[100];
      int l;
      int i=0;
      char res;
      printf("Give word: ");
      scanf("%s", pin);
      l=strlen(pin);
      res=anadr(i,l,pin);
      system("pause");
}

char anadr(int i, int l, char pin[])
{
     if(i<l)
        anadr(i++,l,pin);
     printf("%c", pin[i]);
}
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closed as too localized by Blorgbeard, casperOne Apr 16 '13 at 11:58

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What is the issue exactly? I also suggest return 0 in your main. –  squiguy Apr 15 '13 at 23:32
    
Also your anadr function should be void instead of charas it doesn't return anything. –  Ivo Apr 15 '13 at 23:34
    
The program crushes. If I guess right, the prob is there: if(i<l) anadr(i++,l,pin); –  Nor Tee Apr 15 '13 at 23:34
    
You are right. I adjusted it from char to void but still nothing. –  Nor Tee Apr 15 '13 at 23:36
    
This code also won't reverse the string. It will, however, fail nicely in printing the string in reverse. So what is it you really are trying to do? Print it reversed? Reverse it? Both? –  WhozCraig Apr 15 '13 at 23:38

4 Answers 4

Why not

void anadr(int l, char pin[])
{
     if(l == 0)
          return;

     printf("%c", pin[l - 1]);
     anadr(l - 1, pin);
}

anadr(5, "abcde");
share|improve this answer
    
Worked! Thanks Leo. –  Nor Tee Apr 15 '13 at 23:40
    
@NorTee Please accept if you found useful. –  Leo Natan Apr 15 '13 at 23:44

All your code seems to be trying to do is print the string in reverse. Just recurse to the terminator and dump chars on the way back out.

void anadr(const char *p)
{
    if (!*p)
        return;
    anadr(p+1);
    putchar(*p); 
}
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You have an off by one error and you should not be using ++.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

void anadr(int, int, char pin[]);

int main()
{
      char pin[100];
      int l;
      int i=0;
      //char res;
      printf("Give word: ");
      scanf("%s", pin);
      l=strlen(pin);
      anadr(i,l,pin);
      //system("pause");
}

void anadr(int i, int l, char pin[])
{
     if(i<l-1)
        anadr(i+1,l,pin);
     printf("%c", pin[i]);
}
share|improve this answer

At least one problem is here:

if(i<l)
    anadr(i++,l,pin);

This causes endless recursion, since i++ increments i only after its current value has been passed as argument. Try replacing i++ with i + 1.

Also, the comparison causes an extra call to be made even with the above fix; the character at pin[l] is the terminating NUL, which you almost certainly don't want to print. So the comparison should be if (i+1 < l).

share|improve this answer
    
Yes. It works fine. But, why isn't the ++i work the same as the i+1? –  Nor Tee Apr 15 '13 at 23:44
    
@NorTee i++ evaluates to the value of i before incrementing it by one. ++i would indeed work for the recursion since that evaluates to the value of i after incrementing. But either of these is wrong, because both ++i and i++ change the value of i, and the following line (printf("%c", pin[i])) only works correctly if the value of i has not been changed… –  Arkku Apr 16 '13 at 2:06
    
An alternative that would work is if (++i < l) anadr(i,l,pin); printf("%c", pin[i-1]); (except none of these work correctly if l is 0; then you shouldn't print anything). (By the way, if you found this helpful, please upvote the answer.) –  Arkku Apr 16 '13 at 2:08

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