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Suppose we have a form that allows entering a piece of markdown as a message body. That text is then render in HTML as JSON on another page:

<html>
   <body>
       <script type="text/javascript">
       loadMessage({
           name: 'John Doe',
           message: '**Hello** World'
       });
       </script>
   </body>
</html>

Pretend that loadMessage uses a markdown parser (e.g. marked) and outputs the HTML at runtime.

I've identified a case where a malicious user could cause an error on the page:

<html>
   <body>
       <script type="text/javascript">
       loadMessage({
           name: 'John Doe',
           message: '</script>'
       });
       </script>
   </body>
</html>

Because </script> causes the browser to close the script block, an Unexpected token ILLEGAL exception is thrown. Marked is able to sanitize such an attack, but this attack is even before JavaScript execution.

  1. Strip all <script> and </script> when the initial form is submitted. This would mean updating a lot of our framework code (using ASP.NET MVC - so we'd have to extend the default ModelBinder).
  2. Leverage the JSON formatter for this - convert to '</' + 'script>' when writing the JSON. We'd be keeping the source intact - but maybe that's a bad thing.

How should we mitigate such an attack?

share|improve this question
    
Why don't you escape the HTML entities? –  Blender Apr 16 '13 at 0:23
    
It's markdown and markdown allows HTML. Is it really worth it to escape and then unescape on the client? –  TheCloudlessSky Apr 16 '13 at 0:24
    
Is there any particular reason why you're outputting the Markdown into the JavaScript and not directly into the HTML? –  Blender Apr 16 '13 at 0:25
    
Yes - we bootstrap our models/views on the client to get access to raw data. We're using Backbone and this is a common thing to do with Backbone applications. –  TheCloudlessSky Apr 16 '13 at 0:26
    

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I might personally go along with stripping anything resembling the script tag, as such an approach would provide an extra layer of security against validation bugs in your Markdown parser. But your mileage may vary depending on your application.

If you do need to encode, see http://stackoverflow.com/a/236106/131903 for a reasonable encoding approach (that is, use \x3c to replace the less-than sign). This will work:

<html>
  <script>
    alert("1 \x3c/script> 2");
  </script>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
Would you strip the value when the form is posted or when the JSON is rendered? –  TheCloudlessSky Apr 16 '13 at 11:08
1  
A fair question. It is safer to strip on input, but you lose data permanently. But that way you don't have to strip on every output, and since it is unlikely that script tags would be important data for you, I'd pick the safer route (after adding sufficient unit tests to ensure that my stripper actually works properly). –  Jouni Heikniemi Apr 17 '13 at 11:13
    
Yeah - I'm going to go with stripping on input. Cheers! –  TheCloudlessSky Apr 22 '13 at 18:48

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