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Let's say I have the following domains:

class Store {
    String name

    static hasMany = [ products: StoreProduct ]
}

class Product {
    String name

    static hasMany = [ stores: StoreProduct ]
}

class StoreProduct {
    BigDecimal discount

    static belongsTo = [ store: Store, product: Product ]
    static mapping = {
        id composite: ['store', 'product']
    }

In other words, there is a many-to-many relationship between Store and Product with an intermediate StoreProduct domain class to track the individual discount per store.

Grails has built-in support for one-to-many relationships, so you can pass in a list of IDs with the proper field name and the controller will automatically resolve the IDs to a list of entities. However, in this case it's a many-to-many with an intermediate domain class.

I've tried the following code in the Store edit view to allow a user to select a list of products:

<g:each in="${products}" var="product" status="i">
    <label class="checkbox">
        <input type="checkbox" name="products" value="${product.id}"/>
         ${product.name}
    </label>
</g:each>

But Grails throws various errors depending what I use for the name attribute. I've also tried the following for the input name:

products
products.product
products.product.id
product[0].product
product[0].product.id

But none of them work properly.

My question is, is there any built-in support for this kind of relationship in Grails, particularly when it comes to the view?

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Not when it comes to the view. What are you passing down as products ? Show what the controller is sending. –  James Kleeh Apr 16 '13 at 17:46

2 Answers 2

Change your domain structure as follows:

class Store {
    String name

    Set<Product> getProducts() {
       StoreProduct.findAllByStore(this)*.product
    }
}

class Product {
    String name
    Set<Store> getStores() {
        StoreProduct.findAllByProduct(this)*.store
    }
}

import org.apache.commons.lang.builder.HashCodeBuilder
class StoreProduct implements Serializable {

    BigDecimal discount
    Store store
    Product product

    static mapping = {
        id composite: ['store', 'product']
        version false
    }

boolean equals(other) {
    if (!(other instanceof StoreProduct)) {
        return false
    }

    other.store?.id == store?.id &&
        other.product?.id == product?.id
}

int hashCode() {
    def builder = new HashCodeBuilder()
    if (store) builder.append(store.id)
    if (product) builder.append(product.id)
    builder.toHashCode()
}
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this helps, but I still don't know what to do for the view. –  Daniel T. Apr 16 '13 at 19:59

From the domain classes above:-

  • Either one of the domain (Store or Product) has to take the onus of the relationship by having a belongsTo. Refer API for details.

  • Domain class (StoreProduct) with composite primary key should implement Serializable.

Please also provide a stacktrace to debug if available.

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