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what is the difference of creating hello world on 32 vs 64 on Mac machine? How would it look like? I do have installed the Xcode and gcc but the gcc gives me 64 bit error while running in the terminal!? Did not try Xcode IDE since don't know where to start with the hello world! Thanks.

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closed as not a real question by meagar, NominSim, Krishnabhadra, unkulunkulu, Luca Geretti Apr 16 '13 at 11:37

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There is no difference as far as writing code is concerned.Check the compatability of your compiler with your Mac version. –  Algorithmist Apr 16 '13 at 2:39
    
How are you compiling code, and what error are you getting? –  duskwuff Apr 16 '13 at 3:02
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1 Answer

what is the difference of creating hello world on 32 vs 64 on Mac machine?

None. Well-written, standards-compliant code should not be any different whether it's targeting a 32-bit or 64-bit architecture. This is true for both trivial and complex programs, and is very useful as it allows you to maintain a single code base used for compiling both types of executables. Switching between target architectures should be as simple as flipping a compiler switch.

It's only when you're doing something particularly esoteric that you'll need to maintain different code for different "bitnesses". In such cases, you'll see ugliness like this:

#ifdef __LP64__
  // 64-bit code
#else
  // 32-bit code
#endif

gcc gives me 64 bit error while running in the terminal!?

Since you posted neither 1) the code you actually tried, nor 2) the exact error generated by your compiler, all we can really do is guess.

Assuming that your code works when compiled as 32-bit, my guess is that one of two things is true:

  1. You've made a non-portable assumption that is true on 32-bit architectures, but false on 64-bit architectures. No idea what it is, but the compiler should be telling you. Heed its warning and fix your code (or guard it conditionally as shown above if absolutely necessary).

  2. Your Mac is an older model that has a 32-bit processor with no 64-bit support. You can compile 64-bit code on a 32-bit processor if you have the correct version of the compiler, but you cannot execute that code. It can only be executed on a 64-bit processor.

Did not try Xcode IDE since don't know where to start with the hello world!

That's perfectly reasonable. Xcode is not going to help you here. You are focused on two things: 1) the code you wrote, and 2) the errors generated by the compiler. The Terminal allows you easy access to both of those things.

However, if you're uncomfortable working from a command line, it doesn't hurt to install and use an IDE. Your goal is to learn how to program computers, not flaunt your geek cred at being able to use the terminal. If a GUI makes it easier for you to read and understand what is going on, then use it.

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+1 for "not flaunt your geek cred at being able to use the terminal" –  FeifanZ Apr 16 '13 at 3:17
    
u ruthless, OK with me, my mistake –  small_mac Apr 16 '13 at 16:02
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