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Should I wrap all the files I want to install in individual components? What is the advantage of putting several files in one component?

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up vote 44 down vote accepted

One reason for "one file per component" is resiliency. When an application is started, Windows Installer can check whether the keypath of any component is missing. If the keypath is missing, the component is reinstalled/repaired.

If a component has multiple files, then only one file can be the keypath. In wix you you indicate this by setting KeyPath=yes on a File element. The other files will then not be fully protected by Windows Installer resiliency. They will only be reinstalled if the keypath file goes missing.

Another reason to have "one file per component" is when installing files to locations where they may already be present (e.g. an application upgrade, or when installing to c:\windows\system32). Windows installer determines whether a component needs to be installed by checking the keypath. If the keypath is a file and the file is already there (with the same version or higher) then the component is not installed. That's a problem if the other files in the component actually needed to be installed/upgraded.

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This is a great answer but doesn't say why the reverse is useful. Which is reasonable, as I only know of one advantage: you save some registration time during installation, as each component is registered, but each of its files is not. This is generally not a good tradeoff, as it kills resiliency and hinders upgrades, so pay more attention to wcoenen's recommendation. –  Michael Urman Oct 22 '09 at 15:02
    
@Wim Coenen When using a "file per component" approach, one should put KeyPath="yes" on File, but what about its component? Is it necessary to add the same KeyPath="yes" on File's parent Component? Furthermore, what about Directory? What is the best practice with directories (empty and non empty)? Is there a good guidance on this? Thanks!!! –  zam6ak Apr 27 '12 at 21:38
    
@zam6ak: comments are not the best place to ask new questions, as they get only limited attention and can't accommodate thorough answers. Please post a separate question instead of a comment! –  Wim Coenen Apr 27 '12 at 21:51
    
@Wim Coenen Point taken! Here is the question: stackoverflow.com/q/10358989/481904 –  zam6ak Apr 27 '12 at 23:03
    
@WimCoenen You said "When an application is started, Windows Installer can check whether the keypath of any component is missing." But, it's not always true. According to this site, "There are only certain entry points that trigger auto repair, such as advertised shortcuts, COM activation etc." –  sky Jul 17 '13 at 3:38
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I follow the Microsoft approach which is also used by InstallShield: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa368269(VS.85).aspx

The above link gives the advantages of this approach.

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